Despite Climate Change Setbacks, Al Gore ‘Comes Down On The Side Of Hope’ – Steve Inskeep July 24, 2017 4:44 AM ET


When it comes to convincing climate change deniers, Al Gore says, “Mother Nature is more persuasive than the scientific community.”

Claire Harbage/NPR

Former Vice President Al Gore helped shape the conversation about climate change with An Inconvenient Truth. Now he’s back with a sequel — called An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power, due out next month — and it follows Gore as he continues the crusade he made famous with that first film.

The movie shows Gore standing in Miami floodwater, flying over imploding boulders of ice in Greenland and in Paris — trying to push the climate agreement over the finish line.

President Donald Trump last month, however, promised to undo that victory when he announced plans to pull the U.S. from the Paris climate accord.

“I did my best to convince him to stay in the Paris agreement,” Gore tells NPR’s Steve Inskeep in one of two recent Morning Edition interviews. “And I thought that there was a chance he would come to his senses but I was wrong.”

Still, Gore is hopeful about reversing the effects of global climate change.

“[O]ne of the big differences between today and a decade ago is that we do have the solutions now,” he says. Renewable energy like solar and wind electricity, he says, have evolved just like other technologies such as mobile phones and TVs so that “when production scales up they come down even faster in cost.”

Article continues:

Expedia, Priceline Home In on Airbnb’s Turf – Chris Kirkham July 24, 2017 5:30 a.m. ET


Online travel giants are boosting inventory of home-rental options that can be booked similarly to a hotel, with just a few clicks

A beachfront house in Fort Morgan, Ala., operated by Harris Properties. The company has listed on home rental site VRBO (now owned by HomeAway and Expedia) since the mid-2000s.

A beachfront house in Fort Morgan, Ala., operated by Harris Properties. The company has listed on home rental site VRBO (now owned by HomeAway and Expedia) since the mid-2000s. Photo: Harris Properties

Airbnb Inc.’s grip on the market for short-term home rentals is giving big travel portals like Expedia Inc. EXPE -0.45% and Priceline Group Inc. PCLN -0.22% a fast-growing challenge.

Expedia and Priceline have dominated hotel bookings for two decades. But with the vacation-rental industry rapidly expanding as a popular alternative to hotel stays, the online travel giants are betting big on the sector by boosting their inventory of home-rental options that can be booked similarly to a hotel, with just a few clicks.

The so-called private-accommodation market, which includes vacation rentals, homes or rooms rented out on a short-term basis, is about one-fifth the size of the hotel market based on revenue in the U.S., but it has been growing faster than hotels since 2015, according to data from travel industry-research group Phocuswright. Revenue in the U.S. private accommodation market grew 11% last year from the year earlier, and is projected to grow 8% this year to more than $34 billion; the U.S. hotel industry grew 5% last year to $151 billion and is projected to do the same this year, according to the data.

Article continues:

Meet the lab-coat liberals – By DAVID SIDERS 07/23/2017


Activists and protesters march to City Hall during the March for Science in Los Angeles in April. | Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Dismayed by President Trump’s views on climate science and other research issues, scientists are storming the campaign trail.

LOS ANGELES — The lab-coat liberals are marching on Washington.

Dismayed by President Donald Trump’s perceived hostility to climate science and other areas of research, a surge of scientists is entering the public arena and running for political office for the first time.

They represent an evolving brand of Democrat that has been gaining steam for months. What began with rogue Twitter accounts and protest marches has graduated into candidacies in House races in places as varied as California, Texas, Pennsylvania and New York.

The handful of scientists who have formally announced their candidacies so far — and the others who are preparing to join them — have cast themselves as a counterforce to the Trump administration’s dismissal of climate science and de-prioritization of innovation funding.

Article continues:

With a Michigan City Fighting Back, DHS Pushes a Controversial Deportation Forward – Maryam Saleh July 23 2017, 3:58 a.m.


Lourdes Salazar-Bautista of Ann Arbor speaks at a press conference on ICE policies in Michigan and for an update on the Sava's raid in Liberty Plaza on Saturday, July 8, 2017. Photo: Hunter Dyke/The Ann Arbor News

Lourdes Salazar-Bautista of Ann Arbor speaks at a press conference on ICE policies in Michigan and for an update on the Sava’s raid in Liberty Plaza on Saturday, July 8, 2017. | Photo: Hunter Dyke/The Ann Arbor News

 

In the face of intense community opposition, immigration officials are vowing to push ahead with plans to deport a 20-year Ann Arbor, Michigan, resident.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement has ordered Lourdes Salazar-Bautista, 49, to leave the country by August 2. The local community and elected officials have rallied in support of the mother of three, but ICE spokesperson Khaalid Walls told The Intercept that the agency will not back down.

“In a current exercise of discretion, the agency has allowed her to remain free from custody while timely finalizing her departure plans,” Walls wrote in a statement. “ICE focuses its enforcement resources on individuals who pose a threat to national security, public safety and border security. However, as Secretary Kelly has made clear, ICE will not exempt classes or categories of removable aliens from potential enforcement. All of those in violation of the immigration laws may be subject to immigration arrest, detention and, if found removable by final order, removal from the United States.”

The Mexican native says she’s not done fighting.

“I’m not a threat to this country,” said Salazar-Bautista, choking back her tears during a vigil at St. Mary Student Parish in Ann Arbor on Tuesday evening, broadcast on Facebook live. “I want to have a chance to continue guiding [my children] and educating them so they can reach the future, since I come from a very humble environment, I wasn’t able to reach.”

Article continues:

Why India and Pakistan hate each other – The Economist Jul 22nd 2017


Three score and ten years after their acrimonious split, India and Pakistan remain at daggers drawn. Max Rodenbeck asks if they can ever make up

EVERY AFTERNOON AT sunset, at a point midway along the arrow-straight road between Amritsar and Lahore, rival squads of splendidly uniformed soldiers strut and stomp a 17th-century British military drill known as Beating Retreat (pictured). Barked commands, fierce glares and preposterously high kicks all signal violent intent. But then, lovingly and in unison, the enemies lower their national flags. Opposing guardsmen curtly shake hands, and the border gates roll shut for the night.

As India and Pakistan celebrate their twin 70th birthdays this August, the frontier post of Wagah reflects the profound dysfunction in their relations. On its side Pakistan has built a multi-tiered amphitheatre for the boisterous crowds that come to watch the show. The Indians, no less rowdy, have gone one better with a half-stadium for 15,000. But the number of travellers who actually cross the border here rarely exceeds a few hundred a week.

Wagah’s silly hats and walks serve a serious function. The cuckoo-clock regularity of the show; the choreographed complicity between the two sides; and the fact that the soldiers and crowds look, act and talk very much the same—all this has the reassuring feel of a sporting rivalry between teams. No matter how bad things get between us, the ritual seems to say, we know it is just a game. Alas, the game between India and Pakistan has often turned serious.

Article continues: