Counterintuitive? North Carolina GOP Pushes Unprecedented Bill to Jail Anyone Who Discloses Fracking Chemicals May 21, 2014 by Molly Redden


This post first appeared at Mother Jones.

FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2011 file photo, a drilling rig is set up near a barn in Springville, Pa., to tap gas from the giant Marcellus Shale gas field. In an unlikely partnership between longtime adversaries, some of the nation's biggest energy companies and environmental groups announced Wednesday, March 20, 2013 that they have agreed on a voluntary set of standards for gas and oil fracking in the Northeast. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)In this Oct. 14, 2011 file photo, a drilling rig is set up near a barn in Springville, Pa., to tap gas from the giant Marcellus Shale gas field. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

As hydraulic fracturing ramps up around the country, so do concerns about its health impacts. These concerns have led 20 states to require the disclosure of industrial chemicals used in the fracking process.

North Carolina isn’t on that list of states yet — and it may be hurtling in the opposite direction.

On Thursday, three Republican state senators introduced a bill that would slap a felony charge on individuals who disclosed confidential information about fracking chemicals. The bill, whose sponsors include a member of Republican party leadership, establishes procedures for fire chiefs and health care providers to obtain chemical information during emergencies. But as the trade publication Energywire noted Friday, individuals who leak information outside of emergency settings could be penalized with fines and several months in prison.

“The felony provision is far stricter than most states’ provisions in terms of the penalty for violating trade secrets,” says Hannah Wiseman, a Florida State University assistant law professor who studies fracking regulations.

The bill also allows companies that own the chemical information to require emergency responders to sign a confidentiality agreement. And it’s not clear what the penalty would be for a health care worker or fire chief who spoke about their experiences with chemical accidents to colleagues.

“I think the only penalties to fire chiefs and doctors, if they talked about it at their annual conference, would be the penalties contained in the confidentiality agreement,” says Wiseman. “But [the bill] is so poorly worded, I cannot confirm that if an emergency responder or fire chief discloses that confidential information, they too would not be subject to a felony.” In some sections, she says, “That appears to be the case.”

Article continues:

http://billmoyers.com/2014/05/21/north-carolina-gop-pushes-unprecedented-bill-to-jail-anyone-who-discloses-fracking-chemicals/

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