Bad News: Supreme Court Blocked Power Plant Rules. Good News: The Era of Coal Is Over. – By Eric Holthaus JUNE 29 2015 6:24 PM


Global trends show we're still winning the war on coal, despite Monday's Supreme Court ruling. Here, the Mitchell Power Station, a coal-fired power plant in New Eagle, Pennsylvania, before it was shut down in 2014.  -- Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Global trends show we’re still winning the war on coal, despite Monday’s Supreme Court ruling. Here, the Mitchell Power Station, a coal-fired power plant in New Eagle, Pennsylvania, before it was shut down in 2014.
— Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled against one of the Obama administration’s primary battle victories in the so-called war on coal. The court decided that the government hadn’t appropriately considered the economic cost to the coal industry of new rules designed to limit toxic mercury emissions. But buck up, environmentalists. The defeat for the Environmental Protection Agency probably won’t make much of a difference.

At the heart of the court’s decision was a dispute about the benefits of cracking down on mercury pollution from coal burning. From USA Today:

While the estimated annual cost of $9.6 billion is not widely disputed, the cost-benefit ratio is. Opponents said the benefits are as low as $4 million a year. Proponents said when all secondary pollutants are considered, they’re as high as $90 billion.

Under the Clean Air Act, regulations like this must be “appropriate and necessary.” The Supreme Court took the side of the opponents and ruled that the rules did not fit that mandate. “One would not say that it is even rational, never mind ‘appropriate,’ to impose billions of dollars in economic costs in return for a few dollars in health or environmental benefits,” wrote Justice Antonin Scalia, in the majority opinion. “No regulation is ‘appropriate’ if it does significantly more harm than good.”

The ruling has been widely interpreted as a setback for Obama’s second-term focus on the environment, but a close reading of the ruling shows that not a whole lot will actually change. My Slate colleague Mark Stern has the main takeaway:

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