Why Ticket Brokers Hate the Miami Dolphins – By SHARON TERLEP Oct. 1, 2015 2:20 p.m. ET


In bid to control the resale market, team owner Stephen Ross is investing in one brokerage—while cutting off others

A general view of Sun Life Stadium during a game between the Miami Dolphins and the Buffalo Bills on Sept. 27.

A general view of Sun Life Stadium during a game between the Miami Dolphins and the Buffalo Bills on Sept. 27. Photo: Getty ImagesThe Miami Dolphins haven’t had much luck on the football field this season. But the team’s owner has vaulted to the top of the NFL in another respect: rewriting the rules of ticket scalping. 

In September, the Dolphins went public with a plan to significantly curtail the number of tickets it sells to independent brokers. The goal, the team said, was to make sure fewer tickets ended up being sold to fans of visiting teams. But according to one broker who was cut off, the Dolphins gave a big chunk of these tickets to one firm in particular: Atlanta-based PrimeSport Inc., which was acquired in February by an investor group that includes Dolphins owner Stephen Ross.

In some cases, PrimeSport is selling Dolphins tickets for well more than their face value. For a Jan. 3 matchup with the New England Patriots, the Dolphins’ official website has offered a pair of lower-bowl seats for $421 apiece. On PrimeSport’s site, seats one row behind in the same section cost $636—a 51% markup. For Miami’s Nov. 2 matchup with the Dallas Cowboys, PrimeSport has listed more than 480 tickets at prices of up to $1,200 each. It is not clear whether these tickets came from the Dolphins or another source.

Miami ticket broker Gus Rodriguez said he used to buy about $1 million of Dolphins tickets every year. The team cut his supply back last season, he said, and wouldn’t sell to him at all this year. Rodriguez said that when he pressed the team to explain, he got a call from Nick Forro, the Dolphins’ vice president of ticket sales. “He said, ‘We have a company that our owner owns and we have to do business with them,’” Rodriguez said. “It’s the first time I ever head an executive from a team say, ‘We can’t sell you tickets because we have our own secondary ticket business.”

‘It’s the first time I ever head an executive from a team say, “We can’t sell you tickets because we have our own secondary ticket business.”’

—Miami ticket broker Gus Rodriguez

A team spokesman denied that Forro at any time asserted that the team would only do business with PrimeSport. The Dolphins declined to make Forro available for comment.

In an interview, Ross, the Dolphins owner, said the Dolphins decided to give so much business to PrimeSport because it is a good broker that focuses primarily on packages that include travel and hospitality. “It’s the best one of all of them,” he said. Ross said his stake in PrimeSport, which is held by RSE Ventures, a firm he co-founded, is “very, very small.” People familiar with the deal said it is less than 2%. Ross said he does not believe that the arrangement, in which he earns a small piece of the profits from a company that scalps his team’s tickets, raises any conflict-of-interest issues.

An NFL spokesman said the league office was aware of the investment and had no issues with it.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s