Colleges Flex Lobbying Muscle – By BRODY MULLINS, DOUGLAS BELKIN and ANDREA FULLER Nov. 8, 2015 9:51 p.m. ET


Lynchburg College President Kenneth Garren worried that under a proposed federal college-ratings system, smaller private schools like his, which draw average-performing students from rural Virginia, would be compared with Ivy League schools and large state universities catering to different types of students.

Lynchburg College President Kenneth Garren worried that under a proposed federal college-ratings system, smaller private schools like his, which draw average-performing students from rural Virginia, would be compared with Ivy League schools and large state universities catering to different types of students. PHOTO: JEREMY M. LANGE FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Lynchburg College President Kenneth Garren was sipping wine at a reception before Virginia’s gubernatorial inauguration last year when he spotted a familiar face: Sen. Mark Warner.

Mr. Garren had known the senator for years and had met with the lawmaker’s daughter on campus when she was considering applying to the small Christian college. At the inauguration party, Mr. Garren says, he buttonholed the senator and urged him to oppose a plan from President Barack Obama to create a ratings system for colleges.

Mr. Warner (D., Va.) announced two months later that he opposed Mr. Obama’s plan, saying he had been persuaded by Mr. Garren and other Virginia college presidents. Scores of other members of Congress did the same, and this summer, Mr. Obama announced that he was backing off key elements. The Education Department released a searchable database about colleges in September, but left the ratings possibilities to others.

ENLARGE

Colleges and universities have become one of the most effective lobbying forces in Washington, employing more lobbyists last year than any other industries except drug manufacturing and technology. There are colleges in every congressional district, and 1 in 40 U.S. workers draw a paycheck from a college or university.

Over the last two decades, the higher-education industry has beaten back dozens of government proposals to measure its successes and failures. It has killed efforts to tighten rules for accrediting schools, defeated a proposed requirement to divulge more information about graduation rates and eliminated funding for state agencies that could have closed bad schools. The proposals had support from both sides of the political aisle.

The political pressure on higher education is rooted in a simple but vexing question: Is the government getting a good return on the money it is pouring into the U.S. college system? The government’s goal is to enable nearly every American who wants to go to college to do so. Federal spending on loans and grants, on an inflation-adjusted basis, has jumped more than 50% over the past decade to $134 billion last year, and total federal student-loan debt has hit $1.2 trillion.

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http://www.wsj.com/articles/colleges-flex-lobbying-muscle-1447037474

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