Cleveland Indians Beat Chicago Cubs, Now Lead World Series 3-1 – WSJ


Corey Kluber pitched six sparkling innings on short rest for another win, Jason Kipnis hit a three-run homer in his hometown, and the Cleveland Indians beat the Chicago Cubs 7-2 Saturday night to take a 3-1 lead.

Source: Cleveland Indians Beat Chicago Cubs, Now Lead World Series 3-1 – WSJ

Security News This Week: Ukrainian Group Leaks Emails From Top Putin Aides – Lily Hay Newman Oct 29, 2016


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Baylor Regents Describe Gang Rape, Other Alleged Assault By Football Players – October 29, 20162:27 PM ET


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Former Baylor head football coach Art Briles on Oct. 19, 2013. | Tony Gutierrez/AP

In interviews with the Wall Street Journal, Baylor University regents shared previously undisclosed details of an investigation into the “horrifying” sexual assault allegations against football players at the school.

According to the Journal’report, which was published Friday, the regents said 17 women reported “sexual or domestic assaults involving 19 players, including four alleged gang rapes.”

The investigation, conducted by law firm Pepper Hamilton, concluded in May and led to the removals of president Ken Starr and football coach Art Briles. But the school didn’t release the full results of the investigation, instead publishing a summary of the findings. As the Two-Way reported, the summary said Baylor “failed to consistently support” students who said they had been sexually assaulted and found that two administrators “directly discouraged” reporting such incidences.

The new details revealed in the Journal‘s report bolster this finding. In one instance, the regents say Briles was made aware of an alleged gang rape but did not report it. The report said:

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Why Can’t We Rein In This Ridiculous Military Spending? – WILLIAM D. HARTUNG OCT. 30, 2016 6:00 AM


William Hartung on fear, greed, and the cash cow Congress won’t touch.

This story first appeared on the TomDispatch website.

Through good times and bad, regardless of what’s actually happening in the world, one thing is certain: In the long run, the Pentagon budget won’t go down.

It’s not that the budget has never been reduced. At pivotal moments, like the end of World War II as well as the war’s end in Korea and Vietnam, there were indeed temporary downturns, as there was after the Cold War. More recently, the Budget Control Act of 2011 threw a monkey wrench into the Pentagon’s plans for funding that would go ever onward and upward by putting a cap on the money Congress could pony up for it. The remarkable thing, though, is not that such moments have occurred, but how modest and short-lived they’ve proved to be.

The current DoD budget is roughly $600 billion—more than it was at the peak of Ronald Reagan’s massive arms buildup.

Take the current budget. It’s down slightly from its peak in 2011, when it reached the highest level since World War II, but this year’s budget for the Pentagon and related agencies is nothing to sneeze at. It comes in at roughly $600 billionmore than the peak year of the massive arms buildup initiated by President Ronald Reagan back in the 1980s. To put this figure in perspective: Despite troop levels in Iraq and Afghanistan dropping sharply over the past eight years, the Obama administration has still managed to spend more on the Pentagon than the Bush administration did during its two terms in office.

What accounts for the Department of Defense’s ability to keep a stranglehold on our tax dollars year after endless year?

Pillar one supporting that edifice: ideology. As long as most Americans accept the notion that it is the God-given mission and right of the United States to go anywhere on the planet and do more or less anything it cares to do with its military, you won’t see Pentagon spending brought under real control. Think of this as the military corollary to American exceptionalism—or just call it the doctrine of armed exceptionalism, if you will.

The second pillar supporting lavish military budgets (and this will hardly surprise you): the entrenched power of the arms lobby and its allies in the Pentagon and on Capitol Hill. The strategic placement of arms production facilities and military bases in key states and congressional districts has created an economic dependency that has saved many a flawed weapons system from being unceremoniously dumped in the trash bin of history.

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