The World’s Largest Refugee Camp May Be Closing: VICE News Tonight on HBO – Published on Feb 24, 2017


The high court in Kenya has blocked the government’s bid to close Dadaab, the largest refugee camp in the world. The Kenyan government had hoped to close Dadaab by the end of November, but as the day approached, the registered refugees living there were given a six-month extension.

The Kenyan government has vowed to fight the ruling and close down the camp — which they say has become a recruiting ground for terrorists.

Dadaab is home to more than 275,000 people, many of whom were displaced after fleeing the Somali civil war in 1991. If the camp were to shut down, the refugees would effectively be homeless and stateless.

So where does a population larger than that of 11 African capital cities go? VICE News reports from the camp and speaks to the people facing an uncertain future.

 

Fed Turns to Job Hoppers as 1950s Inflation Guide Shows Its Age – by Steve Matthews February 26, 2017, 9:00 PM PST


  • Economists increasingly analyzing the impact of changing jobs

  • Studies provide ‘deeper analysis of labor markets’ — Bullard

A growing number of Americans are changing employers in search of more moneyPhotographer: Glow Images via Getty Images

Adrienne Heintz, an Atlanta marketing professional, has discovered a reliable way to earn higher wages, and Federal Reserve economists are taking note.

The Auburn University alumnus changed jobs twice in the past two years and nabbed raises of 10 percent and 8 percent as a result. “Switching positions internally or externally is definitely the fastest way to a larger salary,” according to Heintz, who is 28.

She isn’t alone in her approach, as a growing number of Americans are changing employers in search of more money. That trend is attracting the attention of labor economists, who are increasingly studying how job-hopping Americans drive compensation gains. The new focus comes at a time when the long-held theory that the unemployment rate can help forecast moves in wages and inflation is coming under scrutiny.

Studying the impact of job changes “is a more nuanced and deeper analysis of labor markets and gives you a better picture of what’s really going on,” according to James Bullard, president of the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank. “Look at the late ’90s: Unemployment went down to 3.8 percent and we didn’t get all that much inflation.”

Looser Connection

Analysts surveyed by Bloomberg don’t expect lower unemployment rates to fan consumer prices in coming years either. They estimate inflation measured by the personal consumption expenditures price index will remain at the Fed’s 2 percent target in 2018 and 2019 even as the jobless rate drops below today’s 4.8 percent, which central bankers see as full employment.

Commenting on the link between unemployment and inflation, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta President Dennis Lockhart said “the connection doesn’t seem to be as tight as it was in theory.”

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GOP’s New Plan to Repeal Obamacare: Dare Fellow Republicans to Block Effort – By  Louise Radnofsky,  Kristina Peterson and  Stephanie Armour Updated Feb. 26, 2017 10:51 p.m. ET


GOP lawmakers gamble that setting bill in motion to strike Affordable Care Act will help break through intraparty disagreements

The domestic policy agenda of House Speaker Paul Ryan (R., Wis.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) rests on the health-care maneuver paying off first.

The domestic policy agenda of House Speaker Paul Ryan (R., Wis.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) rests on the health-care maneuver paying off first. Photo: mark makela/Reuters

WASHINGTON—Republican leaders are betting that the only way for Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act is to set a bill in motion and gamble that fellow GOP lawmakers won’t dare to block it.

Party leaders are poised to act on the strategy as early as this week, after it has become obvious they can’t craft a proposal that will carry an easy majority in either chamber. Lawmakers return to Washington Monday after a week of raucous town halls in their districts that amplified pressure on Republicans to forge ahead with their health-care plans.

Republican leaders pursuing the “now or never” approach see it as their best chance to break through irreconcilable demands by Republican centrists and conservatives over issues ranging from tax credits to the future of Medicaid.

The new strategy means the health-care law could be overhauled in three precarious steps—reflecting the difficulties of concurrently repealing and replacing the law, as POTUS had sought.

Republicans can afford to lose no more than two GOP votes in the Senate and 22 in the House, assuming they get no support from Democrats. That means any GOP faction could torpedo the repeal effort by withholding its support—and members of each have threatened as much.

Advocates of the strategy hope that knife’s-edge math will be an asset rather than a liability. They are betting different groups of Republican lawmakers can be pacified with a handful of concessions, then will swallow hard and vote for a longstanding repeal pledge, first in the House, then in the Senate.

“You’re a Republican, you’ve been running to repeal Obamacare, they put a repeal bill in front of you… Are you going to be the Republican senator who prevents Obamacare repeal from being sent to a Republican president who is willing to sign it?” said Doug Badger, a longtime Republican leadership health policy adviser.

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A New Kind of Jobs Program for Middle America – By Christopher Mims Feb. 26, 2017 8:00 a.m. ET


Code schools and boot camps that teach computer programming skills prove they can rapidly retrain American workers for the 21st century

Heron Ziegel, a 24-year-old data analyst, at TD Bank's Tech Center in Mount Laurel, N.J., on Feb. 23. Ms. Ziegel attended a three-month intensive coding course after trying to get a graphic-design business off the ground. ‘There aren't enough Americans interested in coding,’ she says.

Heron Ziegel, a 24-year-old data analyst, at TD Bank’s Tech Center in Mount Laurel, N.J., on Feb. 23. Ms. Ziegel attended a three-month intensive coding course after trying to get a graphic-design business off the ground. ‘There aren’t enough Americans interested in coding,’ she says. Photo: Michelle Gustafson for The Wall Street Journal

When Alex Mathis heard there was a coding school in Akron, Ohio, not far from where he lives, he thought its claim—that he could become a gainfully employed computer programmer after a three-month training course—sounded suspicious.

He’d never taken a computer-programming class in his life, but by the time he finished an intensive 12-week, $13,750 program at the Software Guild, he had a job with Buckeye Mountain, a maker of rail freight software. “If you told me several years ago that I was going to be a computer programmer and working for a software company I wouldn’t have believed you,” says Mr. Mathis, who also got a 10% pay bump over his last job, as a shipping manager for a printing company.

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