U.S. Infrastructure Gets ‘D+’ Grade from Civil Engineers – By  Cameron McWhirter The Wall Street Journal Updated March 9, 2017 11:18 a.m. ET


Getting roads, bridges and other structures to a safe, functioning level would cost $4.59 trillion over the next decade, American Society of Civil Engineers says

Part of the over 100-year-old North Broad Street Bridge in Ridgeway, Pa., collapsed in June 2015. A new report says U.S. infrastructure largely fails to maintain a safe, functioning level.

Part of the over 100-year-old North Broad Street Bridge in Ridgeway, Pa., collapsed in June 2015. A new report says U.S. infrastructure largely fails to maintain a safe, functioning level. Photo: Brandon Leithner/Associated Press

American infrastructure has barely maintained a below-standard grade of “D+” over the last four years, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers.

In its “Infrastructure Report Card” issued every four years, the engineering group forecast that it would cost about $4.590 trillion over the next decade to bring the country’s roads, bridges, public schools and ports up to a safe, functioning level, about $2.064 trillion more than what governments and the private sector are ready to spend.

The association, based in Reston, Va., called for infrastructure investment to increase from the current level of about 2.5% of U.S. gross domestic product to 3.5% by 2025.

“When it comes to your infrastructure you should be worried,” said Norma Jean Mattei, 2017 president of ASCE. “President Trump is onto something as he calls for a new program of national rebuilding.”

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