House GOP Health Bill Would Add 23 Million Uninsured, Cut $119 Billion in Deficit Through 2026, CBO Says


Congressional Budget Office’s estimate says bill would lower premiums

The Congressional Budget Office released its appraisal on Wednesday of the health overhaul bill approved by the House. What does it have to say about state waivers and how the less healthy would be affected? WSJ’s Jason Bellini has #TheShortAnswer.

The health-overhaul bill approved by House Republicans would leave 23 million more people uninsured while reducing the cumulative federal deficit by $119 billion in the next decade compared with current law, according to an estimate from the Congressional Budget Office.

The report by the nonpartisan CBO is likely to roil the current Senate talks over its version of the bill to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama’s 2010 Affordable Care Act.

The findings provide ammunition for the two competing factions that Senate Republican leaders need to pull together to pass a bill. Centrist Republicans, concerned about the number of uninsured, hope to make the House bill less far-reaching, while conservatives want to double down on measures the CBO suggests will lower premiums on average.

Percentage of U.S. residents under 65 without health insurance 

Percentage of U.S. residents under 65 without health insurance

The report by the nonpartisan CBO is likely to roil the current Senate talks over its version of the bill to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama’s 2010 Affordable Care Act.

The findings provide ammunition for the two competing factions that Senate Republican leaders need to pull together to pass a bill. Centrist Republicans, concerned about the number of uninsured, hope to make the House bill less far-reaching, while conservatives want to double down on measures the CBO suggests will lower premiums on average.

The health-overhaul bill approved by House Republicans would leave 23 million more people uninsured while reducing the cumulative federal deficit by $119 billion in the next decade compared with current law, according to an estimate from the Congressional Budget Office.

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