The County: the story of America’s deadliest police – Words by Jon Swaine and Oliver Laughland in Bakersfield, California. Video and photography by Mae Ryan. Design and graphics by the Guardian US interactive team


A Guardian series examines Kern County, California, where police have killed more people per capita than anywhere else in the US this year

Words by Jon Swaine and Oliver Laughland in Bakersfield, California. Video and photography by Mae Ryan. Design and graphics by the Guardian US interactive team

Words by Jon Swaine and Oliver Laughland in Bakersfield, California. Video and photography by Mae Ryan. Design and graphics by the Guardian US interactive team

Source: The County: the story of America’s deadliest police | US news | The Guardian

This is why they hate us: The real American history neither Ted Cruz nor the New York Times will tell you – Salon.com


We talk democracy, then overthrow elected governments and prop up awful regimes. Let’s discuss the actual history

Source: This is why they hate us: The real American history neither Ted Cruz nor the New York Times will tell you – Salon.com

Trevor Noah Takes On Ben Carson’s Media Bias Claims – Posted: 11/10/2015 03:22 PM EST | Edited: 11/10/2015 03:33 PM EST


 

 

“Challenge accepted, Dr. Carson.”

Screen Shot 2015-11-11 at Nov 11, 2015 12.34

Trevor Noah on Monday decided to take a closer look at GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson’s assertion that the media is vetting his background more intensely than it did for President Barack Obama during his presidential campaign.

Republican candidates have spent a great deal of time so far in this election cycle criticizing the media for liberal bias — from critiquing the way debates have been moderated to complaining about being treated “unfairly” by the media — and Carson has been no exception to this trend. In an interview that aired Sunday on NBC’s “Meet The Press,” Carson claimed that the media is investigating his past with more fervor than any other presidential candidate in prior elections.

“I have not seen that with anyone else,” Carson told NBC’s Chris Jansing. “If you can show me where that’s happened with someone else, I’ll will take that statement back.”

“Challenge accepted, Dr. Carson,” Noah said on “The Daily Show,” before showing a montage of news clips from the 2008 election cycle in which the media exhaustedly vetted then-Senator Obama’s background — going so far as to question whether he was really a U.S. citizen.

“Yeah, so they vetted Obama to the point where they questioned that he was a legitimate natural-born American citizen,” Noah said. “But at least no one ever accused Obama of not stabbing a guy.”

Article continues:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/trevor-noah-ben-carson_5642073ce4b0307f2caeeacb

 

This Cheat Sheet Will Make You Win Every Climate Argument —By James West


“I don’t see what all those environmentalists are worried about,” sneers your Great Uncle Joe. “Carbon dioxide is harmless, and great for plants!”

Okay. Take a deep breath. If you’re not careful, comments like this can result in dinner-table screaming matches. Luckily, we have a secret weapon: A flowchart that will help you calmly slay even the most outlandish and annoying of climate-denying arguments:

Climate argument flowchart

‘The Big Bang Theory’ Has Hidden Jokes Down to a Science – By JO CRAVEN MCGINTY Oct. 2, 2015 1:48 p.m. ET


In an episode of ‘The Big Bang Theory’ last season, Sheldon, played by Jim Parsons, tries to talk his friend Leonard out of having surgery by demonstrating his probability of dying if things go wrong.

In an episode of ‘The Big Bang Theory’ last season, Sheldon, played by Jim Parsons, tries to talk his friend Leonard out of having surgery by demonstrating his probability of dying if things go wrong. PHOTO: MICHAEL YARISH/WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC.

 

“The Big Bang Theory,” the CBS sitcom about a pair of socially awkward physicists from the California Institute of Technology, their egghead friends, and the one normal person they socialize with, has serious geek cred.

But what casual viewers may not realize is the lengths to which producers have gone to ensure that the whiteboard equations and physics jokes that make up the witty banter between nerdy roommates Sheldon Cooper and Leonard Hofstadter are scientifically accurate.

A lot of the humor is over the heads of the general audience. But there are jokes inside of jokes, and for those who recognize the science, they’re hilarious. The show takes this stuff so seriously that it employs a UCLA physics professor to make sure it gets it right.

Case in point: In a 2009 episode, “The Jiminy Conjecture,” Sheldon and Howard heard a chirp and then argued over which variety of cricket made the sound.

On the whiteboard in the background is Dolbear’s law, which states the relationship between the air temperature and the rate at which crickets chirp.

“I went to a Dolbear presentation at Tufts, and they talked about this, in like 1989,” says one high-profile fan of the show, Seamus Blackley, one of the creators of Microsoft’s original Xbox game console. “I remembered it!”

“Once I realized what was going on, it was awesome,” added Mr. Blackley, who is also trained in physics. “It’s the No. 1 show, and it has actual physics in it.”

 

Article continues:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-big-bang-theory-has-hidden-jokes-down-to-a-science-1443808102