Special Report: When it comes to e-cigs, Big Tobacco is concerned for your health – BY MARTINNE GELLER ` Mon Mar 23, 2015 3:14am EDT


1 OF 3. An employee 'Vapologist' (R) stands behind the bar as he puffs on an e-cigarette with customers at the Henley Vaporium in New York City in this December 18, 2013 file photo. CREDIT: REUTERS/MIKE SEGAR/FILES

1 OF 3. An employee ‘Vapologist’ (R) stands behind the bar as he puffs on an e-cigarette with customers at the Henley Vaporium in New York City in this December 18, 2013 file photo.
CREDIT: REUTERS/MIKE SEGAR/FILES

(Reuters) – The health warning on a MarkTen electronic cigarette package is 116 words long.

That’s much longer than the warnings on traditional cigarette packs in the United States. Nicotine, the e-cigarette warning says, is “addictive and habit-forming, and it is very toxic by inhalation, in contact with the skin, or if swallowed.” It is not intended for women who are pregnant or breast-feeding, or people … who take medicine for depression or asthma. “Nicotine can increase your heart rate and blood pressure and cause dizziness, nausea and stomach pain,” says MarkTen, a leading brand in the United States. The ingredients can be “poisonous.”

MarkTen’s parent company Altria, maker of Marlboro cigarettes, said the language seemed appropriate. There is no required health warning on electronic cigarettes in the United States, so “we had to do what we thought was right,” said a spokesman for Altria Client Services.

The company’s frankness about the perils of nicotine dates back to the late 1990s, when it led a campaign for cigarettes to be regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Small tobacco companies at the time said the big guys would use regulation to seal their dominance. Today, small e-cigarette makers are saying the same thing. Many argue that firms like Altria and Reynolds American want hefty rules to help neutralize the threat that e-cigarettes pose to their businesses. By accentuating the risks of ‘vaping,’ they say, big firms may deter smokers from trying the new devices, even though most scientists agree they are safer.

“If you read that (warning) as a smoker, you might think ‘Oh, I’ll just stick with a cigarette,'” said Oliver Kershaw, a former 15-a-day-smoker who quit through e-cigarettes and founded websites that advocate them.

Article continues:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/03/23/us-ecigarettes-regulations-specialreport-idUSKBN0MJ0GN20150323

Case Sparks Debate About Teen Decision Making in Health – By Kimberly Leonard Jan. 22, 2015 | 12:01 a.m. EST


A Connecticut teen is being given chemotherapy against her will.

Some doctors say the decision is made in the best interest of the patient, and not based on maturity.

Some doctors say the decision is made in the best interest of the patient, and not based on maturity.

Some doctors say the decision is made in the best interest of the patient, and not based on maturity.

Only months before turning 18, a Connecticut girl has been told by her state’s supreme court that she must undergo chemotherapy against her wishes in a case that has drawn national headlines and raised questions about what rights minors truly have over their bodies.

The teen, identified in court papers only as “Cassandra C.,” was removed from her home in December after she missed medical appointments for Hodgkin’s lymphoma, or cancer of the lymph system. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society says the disease is highly curable, with an 85 percent chance of survival. Doctors proposed a six-month chemotherapy course. Without it, she is likely to die in two years.

But Cassandra balked at the treatment and said she didn’t want to go through with it. Social services became involved and, after an emergency legal appeal, the state’s high court said on Jan. 8 the teen could be forced to receive the therapy.

`Article continues:

http://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2015/01/22/case-sparks-debate-about-teen-decision-making-in-health?int=a14709