Falsely Institutionalized By Her Husband (Excerpt from ‘India’s Mental Health Crisis’) – Vice News Published on Oct 28, 2015


India is currently suffering a mental health crisis. With only 43 government-run mental hospitals serving a population of 1.2 billion, resources are spread thin. What’s more, mental illness is highly stigmatized in India, especially among women, who are typically committed to mental health facilities with no legal rights, receiving involuntary treatment, and sometimes without a proper diagnosis.

In this excerpt, VICE News speaks with “Vidya,” a woman who was falsely institutionalized by her husband in order to file for divorce.

Watch: Institutionalized: Mental Health Behind Bars – http://bit.ly/1DHIqYj

On The Line: Neha Shastry Discusses India’s Mental Health Crisis – Vice News Published on Oct 19, 2015


India is currently suffering a mental health crisis. With only 43 government-run mental hospitals serving a population of 1.2 billion, resources are spread thin. What’s more, mental illness is highly stigmatized in India, especially among women, who are typically committed to mental health facilities with no legal rights, receiving involuntary treatment, and sometimes without a proper diagnosis.

VICE News and On The Line want to hear from you! Let us know your questions on Twitter with the hashtag #ontheline, or send us a video message on Skype.

To send us a Skype video message, follow the instructions here: http://bit.ly/1Fpn9lC

Sandrine Thuret: You can grow new brain cells. Here’s how – Filmed June 2015 at TED@BCG London


Can we, as adults, grow new neurons? Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret says that we can, and she offers research and practical advice on how we can help our brains better perform neurogenesis—improving mood, increasing memory formation and preventing the decline associated with aging along the way.

Locked Up and Forgotten: India’s Mental Health Crisis – Vice News Published on Oct 5, 2015


India is currently suffering a mental health crisis. With only 43 government-run mental hospitals serving a population of 1.2 billion, resources are spread thin. What’s more, mental illness is highly stigmatized in India, especially among women, who are typically committed to mental health facilities with no legal rights, receiving involuntary treatment, and sometimes without a proper diagnosis.

VICE News travels to Maharashtra to investigate what it’s like to be deemed a woman with mental illness in India today.

Watch: Institutionalized: Mental Health Behind Bars – http://bit.ly/1DHIqYj

Samuel Cohen: Alzheimer’s is not normal aging — and we can cure it – Filmed June 2015 at TED@BCG London


More than 40 million people worldwide suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, and that number is expected to increase drastically in the coming years. But no real progress has been made in the fight against the disease since its classification more than 100 years ago. Scientist Samuel Cohen shares a new breakthrough in Alzheimer’s research from his lab as well as a message of hope. “Alzheimer’s is a disease,” Cohen says, “and we can cure it.”

When He Says Yoga Saved His Life, He’s Not Exaggerating – MARC SILVER AUGUST 28, 2015 12:40 PM ET


Yoga Pose

Yes, it’s a cliche: “Yoga saved my life.”

Google the phrase, and you’ll get 12 million matches!

But when Walter Mugbe says it, he really means it. It’s not an exaggeration. It’s the truth.

When Mugbe was 7, growing up in Nairobi, Kenya, his father, John, died in a car accident. John Mugbe was an electrician, and his salary supported the family of five children. Walter’s mother, Catherine, didn’t work. Suddenly, the family was in crisis. The two older siblings had a tough time. At a very young age, Walter Mugbe felt he had to make sure his younger siblings had enough to eat.

To earn money, he began transporting drugs for dealers. By the time he was 10, he was selling drugs and picking pockets as well.

But he lived a kind of double life — he excelled in what he calls “acrobatics”and took classes to improve his skills. That training had real-life benefits. When you’re a pickpocket, he says, you do a lot of running and jumping to get away from victims and from the cops.

Did his mother know what was going on? “She didn’t want to know,” he says.

By the time he was in his early teens, two of his friends had been “killed by a mob,” he says. “I knew I was going to be the next person to die.”

And then, yes, yoga saved his life.

In 2007, Paige Elenson came to town. A businesswoman and yoga teacher, she co-founded the Africa Yoga Project and began offering free classes in poor neighborhoods in Nairobi to ease tensions after election-related violence and give people a way to “positively transform lives.”

There was a class at the school where Mugbe practiced soccer, so he signed up. He went through the poses for the first time. He was in downward dog. He lifted one leg to the sky and brought it down in front of his body, parallel to the front of his mat. He folded himself flat over his leg. He was in half-pigeon pose. (That’s the sequence in the animated GIF above.)

“I felt so free and safe at that moment,” he says. He was always on the run in his criminal life. And now, his worries were gone. “I felt light, like something was weighing me down and all of a sudden I felt free. It was a brand new experience for me.”

Walter Mugbe kept taking yoga classes.

Some family members and friends thought he was getting into a crazy cult. That didn’t bother him because he loved yoga. Eventually he gave up his criminal activities. He looked at who he was and who he wanted to become. “It was tough to face the truth,” he says.

AYP offered him a scholarship for teacher training. Today at age 26, Mugbe is one of 100 teachers who lead free classes for kids and teenagers as well as adults in the slums of Nairobi, reaching thousands each week.

Walter Mugbe, a teacher with the Africa Yoga Project, demonstrates side plank in the Bethesda, Md., studio of Down Dog Yoga.

Walter Mugbe, a teacher with the Africa Yoga Project, demonstrates side plank in the Bethesda, Md., studio of Down Dog Yoga.

Mahafreen H. Mistry/NPR

Mugbe visited Washington, D.C., this summer to spread the word about AYP and teach classes at the local studios of Down Dog Yoga, an AYP sponsor. The Down Dog studios are heated to the mid-90s, which is not the case at home: “It’s hot in Kenya.”

With a twinkle in his eyes and a sweet grin, he tells his American students to really root down deep in a pose. And he makes them hold it for what seems like eternity plus five minutes. “The worst that can happen is you get stronger, you get flexible,” he teases. There’s another benefit, he says: “When you are firmly rooted to your purpose, you are unmessable with.”

Here in D.C. the majority of his students are women — that’s pretty much the norm in the West. In Kenya, he says, yoga is a guy thing. Men like the physical nature of it. But the Africa Yoga Project is training female teachers and persuading girls to take classes.

While some Western practitioners don’t want to be touched by their teacher to adjust a pose, that’s not a problem in Nairobi: “People love to be touched in Africa,” Mugbe says.

His family is doing well now. His older brother is a safari guide. His younger sister just graduated from high school. His younger brother is, like Walter, a yoga teacher.

In classes he talks about “the magic moment” a pose can bring. Even now, secure in his career as a yoga teacher, happy that his family is flourishing, he finds comfort in his favorite pose, half-pigeon. It still makes him feel “free — and flexible.”

Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong TEDGlobalLondon · 14:42 · Filmed Jun 2015


What really causes addiction — to everything from cocaine to smart-phones? And how can we overcome it? Johann Hari has seen our current methods fail firsthand, as he has watched loved ones struggle to manage their addictions. He started to wonder why we treat addicts the way we do — and if there might be a better way. As he shares in this deeply personal talk, his questions took him around the world, and unearthed some surprising and hopeful ways of thinking about an age-old problem.

PSYCHOSURGEONS USE LASERS TO BURN AWAY MENTAL ILLNESS – NICK STOCKTON


Coloured MRI Scan Of Human Brain

Coloured MRI Scan Of Human Brain

A brain surgeon begins an anterior cingulotomy by drilling a small hole into a patient’s skull. The surgeon then inserts a tiny blade, cutting a path through brain tissue, then inserts a probe past sensitive nerves and bundles of blood vessels until it reaches a specific cluster of neural connections, a kind of switchboard linking emotional triggers to cognitive tasks. With the probe in place, the surgeon fires up a laser, burning away tissue until the beam has hollowed out about half a teaspoon of grey matter.

This is the shape of modern psychosurgery: Ablating parts of the brain to treat mental illnesses. Which might remind you of that maligned procedure, the lobotomy. But psychosurgeries are different. And not just because the ethics are better today; because the procedures actually work. Removing parts of a person’s brain is always a dicey proposition. But for people who are mentally ill, when pills and psychiatry offer no solace, the laser-tipped probe can be a welcome relief.

And boy, do they need relief. Yes, cutting into someone’s brain sounds extreme, but physicians perform these procedures only on people who’ve failed to respond to at least three types of medications, and for whom months on a counselor’s couch have had no effect. For decades these kind of surgeries have been out of favor, but now—in certain cases—psychiatrists, neuroscientists, and physicians are finding that they might provide a treatment of last resort. “For these patients who are the sickest of the sick they should be allowed the best option at a normal life,” says Charles Mikell, a neurosurgery resident at Columbia University Medical Center.

For people who need them, psychosurgeries can be highly effective. Success rates are relatively high.

In the 1930s, doctors infamously used lobotomies to treat aggressive, demented, or otherwise affected people. These first treatments were awful, but led to useful ideas about neurological diseases like Parkinson’s and epilepsy. It wasn’t until the 1990s that people brought them back to treat a mental illness: Obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Without any visible biomarkers, obsessive-compulsive disorder is difficult to treat with drugs. But neuroscientists have narrowed down the faulty wiring involved in the disorder to fewer than a half dozen places in the brain—some of which psychosurgery can target. Probably the best target is a region called the anterior cingulate cortex. Put your finger on your temple, then move it about an inch back. If you were to triangulate a point between your fingertip, the top of your head, and the center of your forehead, you’d land roughly on the right spot.

 

Article continues:

http://www.wired.com/2015/06/laser-psychosurgery/