Militia Camp Overrun With Disease and Suffering (Excerpt from ‘Libya’s Migrant Trade’) – Vice News Published on Oct 2, 2015


In a desperate bid to seek a better life in Europe, thousands of refugees and migrants leave the shores of Libya and cross the perilous Mediterranean Sea every month. Over 2,000 people have died making the journey in 2015 alone.

The routes to and journey through Libya are also dangerous, however, and since the fall of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, the country has struggled to achieve and maintain stability. Porous desert borders, rival fighters, and weak governance have left much of Libya in complete chaos.

With militias controlling large swathes of land, their attentions have turned to the people that cross their territories. The fighters assert they are bringing order to the country as they detain the refugees, yet these people’s lives have become valuable commodities to the militias as they try to solidify their positions in the country.

In this excerpt from ‘Libya’s Migrant Trade,’ VICE News visits a militia-run camp in a suburb of Tripoli, where migrants and refugees endure harsh conditions and suffer from starvation and disease.

Watch “Libya’s Migrant Trade: Europe or Die (Full Length)” – http://bit.ly/1V943t1

Libya’s Migrant Trade: Europe or Die (Full Length) – Vice News Published on Sep 17, 2015


In a desperate bid to seek a better life in Europe, thousands of refugees and migrants leave the shores ofLibya and cross the perilous Mediterranean Sea every month. Over 2,000 people have died making the journey in 2015 alone.

The routes to and journey through Libya are also dangerous, however, and since the fall of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, the country has struggled to achieve and maintain stability. Porous desert borders, rival fighters, and weak governance have left much of Libya in complete chaos.

With militias controlling large swathes of land, their attentions have turned to the people that cross their territories. The fighters assert they are bringing order to the country as they detain the refugees, yet these people’s lives have become valuable commodities to the militias as they try to solidify their positions in the country.

VICE News secured exclusive access to a camp outside Tripoli, run by a militia that has seized hundreds of migrants. Food is scarce, dehydration and disease is rife, and control comes in the form of whips and warning shots. The militia claims to have the migrants’ interests at heart, but what emerges is a very different story.

VICE News secured exclusive access to a camp outside Tripoli, run by a militia that has seized hundreds of migrants.

Watch “Stopover in Serbia: Breaking Borders (Dispatch 4)” – http://bit.ly/1JbWohd

Kidnapped and Sold: Libya’s Migrant Trade (Part 2) – Vice News Published on Sep 16, 2015


In a desperate bid to seek a better life in Europe, thousands of refugees and migrants leave the shores of Libya and cross the perilous Mediterranean Sea every month. Over 2,000 people have died making the journey in 2015 alone.

The routes to and journey through Libya are also dangerous, however, and since the fall of Muammar Qaddafi in 2011, the country has struggled to achieve and maintain stability. Porous desert borders, rival fighters, and weak governance have left much of Libya in complete chaos.

With militias controlling large swathes of land, their attentions have turned to the people that cross their territories. The fighters assert they are bringing order to the country as they detain the refugees, yet these people’s lives have become valuable commodities to the militias as they try to solidify their positions in the country.

VICE News secured exclusive access to a camp outside Tripoli, run by a militia that has seized hundreds of migrants. Food is scarce, dehydration and disease is rife, and control comes in the form of whips and warning shots. The militia claims to have the migrants’ interests at heart, but what emerges is a very different story.

In part two of a two-part series, VICE News speaks to migrants and refugees rounded up by a militia in Tripoli, before returning to another militia camp to speak to a young Eritrean migrant who calls upon the United Nations for help.

Watch “Detained by Militias: Libya’s Migrant Trade (Part 1)” – http://bit.ly/1Mb2jrx

Under Fire With the Right Sector (Excerpt from ‘Ukraine’s Failed Ceasefire’) – Published on Aug 21, 2015


On the frontlines in eastern Ukraine, a number of volunteer battalions fight alongside the Ukrainian army, holding the line against separatist attacks.

One of those volunteer groups is the Right Sector, an ultranationalist group who were prominent during the 2014 Euromaidan revolution. Unlike other volunteer groups, the Right Sector has not been absorbed into Ukrainian military structure and so oversight of their conduct is minimal.

Despite allegations of theft, torture, and extrajudicial killings, the group continues to operate on the frontlines in some of the most dangerous locations. But it has recently protested against the ceasefire, and clashed with police in the west of the country over an alleged smuggling ring.

In this excerpt from ‘Ukraine’s Failed Ceasefire,’ VICE News spent time with Right Sector soldiers at their positions outside the strategically important factory town of Avdiivka, just a few miles north of Donetsk International Airport, which is held by Donetsk People’s Republic rebel forces.

Watch “On The DNR Frontline: Ukraine’s Failed Ceasefire (Part 1)” – http://bit.ly/1JbwDhf

The Future Of Yemen After The Siege (Extra Scene from ‘The Siege Of Aden’) – Published on Aug 7, 2015


VICE News filmmaker Medyan Dairieh spent two weeks in Yemen’s seaport city of Aden. Surrounded by Houthi militia rebels and under siege “from air, land, and sea,” Aden is the focal point of the Yemeni Southern Resistance.

Amid an ongoing humanitarian crisis, enduring the chaos of near-constant shelling and menace of snipers, he films with refugees, local politicians, and a training camp teaching young Yemenis to continue fighting the Houthi forces.

Dairieh also visits the front lines, where his group comes under incoming fire. The conflict is also taking its toll on innocent children and in a Médecins Sans Frontières hospital we witness the graphic cost of war.

In this extra scene, a group of local government workers and resistance fighters meet to discuss the future of Yemen and the possible separation of the south of the country from the north.

Read: As Yemenis Starve, Saudi Arabia is Accused of War Crimes in the Country – http://bit.ly/1OTHsZY

The Siege Of Aden – Vice News Published on Jul 31, 2015


VICE News filmmaker Medyan Dairieh spent two weeks in Yemen’s seaport city of Aden. Surrounded by Houthi militia rebels and under siege “from air, land, and sea,” Adenis the focal point of the Yemeni Southern Resistance.

Amid an ongoing humanitarian crisis, enduring the chaos of near-constant shelling and menace of snipers, he films with refugees, local politicians, and a training camp teaching young Yemenis to continue fighting the Houthi forces.

Dairieh also visits the frontlines, where his group comes under incoming fire. The conflict is also taking its toll on innocent children and in a Médecins Sans Frontières hospital we witness the graphic cost of war.

Watch “Inside War-Torn Yemen: Sanaa Under Attack” –  http://bit.ly/1cBKnJ4

Read “Saudi-led Coalition Announces Ceasefire in Yemen Shortly After Airstrike Kills 80” –  http://bit.ly/1HUO3RM

Chattanooga shooting: Pentagon discourages civilian guards – BBC News July 25 2015


Terry Jackson, left, and Jonathan McCroskey, members of Operation Hero Guard, outside military recruiting station in Cleburne, Texas. 21 July 2015

Armed civilians, calling themselves Operation Hero Guard, gathered outside a military recruiting station in Cleburne, Texas

The Pentagon has urged US citizens not to carry out armed patrols outside military recruitment centres.

Civilians acting as unofficial guards have appeared outside some centres since five service personnel were shot dead last week in Tennessee.

Military personnel are generally barred from carrying firearms at recruitment centres and bases.

The Pentagon says it appreciates the support but armed civilians could pose an unintended security risk.

“While we greatly appreciate the outpouring of support for our recruiters from the American public, we ask that individuals not stand guard at recruiting offices as it could adversely impact our mission, and potentially create unintended security risks,” said spokesman Peter Cook in a statement.

“We continue to partner with and rely on first responders for the safety of the communities where our service members live and work.”

US authorities say 24-year-old gunman Muhammed Youssef Abdulazeez acted alone when he attacked two military facilities in Chattanooga, Tennessee, killing five US service members.

Abdulazeez was shot and killed by police during the attack. His motive was unclear.

Since then, armed civilians – some of them members of private militias – have turned up outside recruitment centres saying they are supporting those inside.

One group appeared in Cleburne, Texas, armed with assault rifles and calling themselves Operation Hero Guard.

In Lancaster, Ohio, armed civilians were ordered off the property after one accidentally discharged his rifle into the pavement.

US officials say there is no indication of further danger to recruitment centres and the government does not intend to change the way they are staffed.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-33662891