What If Everything You Knew About Disciplining Kids Was Wrong? – —By Katherine Reynolds Lewis | July/August 2015 Issue


Negative consequences, timeouts, and punishment just make bad behavior worse. But a new approach really works.

June Arbelo, a second-grade teacher at Central School, comforts a student who wants to go home during the first day of school. Tristan Spinski/GRAIN

June Arbelo, a second-grade teacher at Central School, comforts a student who wants to go home during the first day of school. Tristan Spinski/GRAIN

June Arbelo, a second-grade teacher at Central School, comforts a student who wants to go home during the first day of school.Tristan Spinski/GRAIN

Leigh Robinson was out for a lunchtime walk one brisk day during the spring of 2013 when a call came from the principal at her school. Will, a third-grader with a history of acting up in class, was flipping out on the playground. He’d taken off his belt and was flailing it around and grunting. The recess staff was worried he might hurt someone. Robinson, who was Will’s educational aide, raced back to the schoolyard.

Will was “that kid.” Every school has a few of them: that kid who’s always getting into trouble, if not causing it. That kid who can’t stay in his seat and has angry outbursts and can make a teacher’s life hell. That kid the other kids blame for a recess tussle. Will knew he was that kid too. Ever since first grade, he’d been coming to school anxious, defensive, and braced for the next confrontation with a classmate or teacher.

Article continues:

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2015/05/schools-behavior-discipline-collaborative-proactive-solutions-ross-greene

How dads improve their kids’ lives, according to science by Eleanor Barkhorn on June 21, 2015


When Paul Raeburn became a father for the first time, he had one piece of advice to go on. “The most important things to do,” a colleague told him, are “to tell your kids you love them and to spend time with them.” Several years later, he remarried, had a second set of kids, and was determined to learn more about fatherhood than the basic guidelines he’d followed the first time around.

Article continues:

http://www.vox.com/2014/6/14/5804858/how-dads-improve-their-kids-lives-according-to-science

If America really valued mothers, we wouldn’t treat them like this – Updated by Ezra Klein on May 10, 2015


Last Mother’s Day, a video from Cardstore.com went viral. In it, the company pretended to recruit for a seemingly impossible job. They told applicants that the job requires you to stand all day and put in 135 hours a week — or more. It means you have to work nights and weekends. There’s no time off, and the hours increase around Thanksgiving, Christmas and other holidays. The position requires skill in finance, medicine and food preparation. It entails intense physical labor and a total collapse in your personal life. Oh, and it pays absolutely nothing.

They called the job director of operations, but its real title, of course, is mom.

Cardstore.com sent the video out into the world video with the hashtag #WorldsToughestJob. But here’s the thing about the world’s toughest job: a lot of the people doing it also hold another job, or even a few other jobs. More than two-thirds of mothers hold jobs outside the home, and mothers are the primary earners in 40 percent of families. But in America, public policy makes balancing those jobs a lot harder than it has to be.

America is, for instance, one of the only countries in the world that doesn’t guarantee paid maternity leave. This map from UCLA’s World Policy Analysis Center tells the tale well: our maternal leave policies make us look more like Papua New Guinea than, say, any country in Western Europe:

Paid_leavemothers

UCLA

Of course, it would be easier for mothers to balance work inside and outside the home if fathers could spend more time parenting. But public policy is even less friendly to that prospect:

Paid_leave_fathers

UCLA

Sweden is an example of what it looks like when a country really believes that being a parent is a difficult and important job that needs to be supported by public policy. They guarantee parents 480 paid days per child. Those days can be allocated as the parents see fit until the child is eight years old. In order to encourage fathers to take on more parenting responsibilities, 60 of those days are specifically given to the father.

The United States, by contrast, is an example of what it look like when a country merely pays lip service to the importance of parents. While a handful of states, like California, offer modest paid maternal leave, there’s no federal guarantee of either paid maternal or paternal leave. We make mothers choose between spending a month with their newborn child or keeping a roof over their child’s head. That’s not how it looks in countries that value the work mothers do.

The US doesn’t even ensure that parents get leave that they can use for child care. For instance, a lot of parents (sadly) use vacation days when they need a day off to care for a sick child. But in the US — unlike in every other developed nation — there is no guarantee of paid vacation days:

Paid_vacation

Center for Economic and Policy Research

Nor, of course, is there a guarantee of paid sick days. The Center for Economic and Policy Research looked at guaranteed paid leave policies for workers who got sick with a 5-day flu and a 50-day cancer treatment. The distinction was meaningless in the US, though, as both situations presented the same answer: no guarantee of paid time off at all.

Article continues:

http://www.vox.com/2014/5/12/5708362/how-america-makes-the-worldshardestjob-even-harder

Institutional Racism Is Our Way of Life – US News – By Jeff Nesbit May 2015


Endless studies and reports show that racism exists, whether we want to believe it or not.

Mourners line up to see the body of Freddie Gray last month.

Mourners line up to see the body of Freddie Gray last month.

It’s probably time to dust off some of the profound, disturbing statistics on institutional racism in America that have been painstakingly chronicled by groups like the Sentencing Project, the ACLU, American Psychological Association, the Education Department’s Civil Rights office and many others.

Because, apparently, we still don’t get it.

In the wake of Baltimore, Ferguson, New York City and elsewhere, most of us are at least somewhat aware of the nature of police violence against the black community in urban settings.

So maybe we should just start with institutional racism in schools, and work our way forward from there.

[READ: America, Racial Bias Does Exist]

Let’s start with pre-school. Black pre-schoolers are far more likely to be suspended than white children, NPR reported. Black children make up 18 percent of the pre-school population, but represent almost half of all out-of-school suspensions.

Once you get to K-12, black children are three times more likely to be suspended than white children. Black students make up almost 40 percent of all school expulsions, and more than two thirds of students referred to police from schools are either black or Hispanic, says the Department of Education.

Even disabled black children suffer from institutional racism. About a fifth of disabled children are black – yet they account for 44 and 42 percent of disabled students put in mechanical restraints or placed in seclusion.

When juveniles hit the court system, it discriminates against blacks as well. Black children are 18 times more likely to be sentenced as adults than white children, and make up nearly 60 percent of children in prisons, according to the APA. Black juvenile offenders are much more likely to be viewed as adults in juvenile detention proceedings than their white counterparts.

Article continues:

http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/at-the-edge/2015/05/06/institutional-racism-is-our-way-of-life?int=a14709

Clint Smith: How to raise a black son in America – Ted Talk Filmed March 2015 at TED2015


As kids, we all get advice from parents and teachers that seems strange, even confusing. This was crystallized one night for a young Clint Smith, who was playing with water guns in a dark parking lot with his white friends. In a heartfelt piece, the poet paints the scene of his father’s furious and fearful response.

Exposing the Murky World of Online Ads Aimed at Kids – JULIA GREENBERG BUSINESS 04.07.15 8:22 PM


EXPOSING THE MURKY WORLD OF ONLINE ADS AIMED AT KIDS

When YouTube released an app specifically for kids a couple months back, many parents rejoiced. If the app worked as promised, they’d have to worry less about their kids stumbling onto grown-up content on the video network, much less on cable’s carnival of depravity. But a more insidious threat may be afoot in this supposedly innocent walled-off world.

At least, that’s the claim of 10 consumer watchdog groups who filed a joint complaint today with the Federal Trade Commission over the YouTube Kids app, claiming it misleads parents and violates rules on “unfair and deceptive marketing” for kids.

YouTube launched their kid-targeted app in February in the hopes of offering “a safer and easier” way for tots to find shows like Reading Rainbow and Thomas the Tank Engine online. The app promised to limit content to family-friendly videos, channels, and educational clips—a concept pretty much lauded by parents. But child advocacy groups say YouTube is deceiving kids by mixing ads and content without clear delineations.

That may or may not be the case. But in raising the issue at all, the complaint casts light on a wider concern. When it comes to advertising to kids, the rules for the internet are fuzzier than the tightly regulated world of television, in large part because internet advertising itself is always changing. In the meantime, kids could be left vulnerable.

Blurring the Boundaries

Article continues:

http://www.wired.com/2015/04/exposing-murky-world-online-ads-aimed-kids/