James Comey: FBI has found no criminal wrongdoing in new Clinton emails – Alan Yuhas in San Francisco, Sabrina Siddiqui in Cleveland, Ben Jacobs in Sterling Heights, Michigan and Spencer Ackerman in New York Monday 7 November 2016 02.10 EST


theguardian.com

Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:34 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Mute Clinton campaign ‘glad that FBI email investigation has been resolved’

Clinton campaign ‘glad that FBI email investigation has been resolved’

The FBI has determined that a new batch of emails linked to Hillary Clinton’s private email server “have not changed our conclusion” that she committed no criminal wrongdoing, FBI director James Comey told congressional leaders in a letter on Sunday.

As campaigning continued ahead of Tuesday’s presidential election, a Clinton spokeswoman said the candidate was “glad this matter is resolved”.

The Democratic nominee’s opponent, Donald Trump, reacted with anger at the news, and cast doubt on whether the FBI had even carried out its work. “You can’t review 650,000 emails in eight days,” Donald Trump told a campaign rally in Sterling Heights, Michigan on Sunday evening.

On 28 October, only 11 days before the presidential election, Comey sent congressional leaders a letter informing them that agents had discovered emails “that appear pertinent” to a prior investigation, into Clinton’s use of a private server while she was secretary of state. It was later reported that as many as 650,000 such emails were in question.

The move, so close to an election, proved tremendously controversial. In July, Comey had announced that Clinton and her aides were “extremely careless” but that “no reasonable prosecutor” would bring a case against them.

Article continues: 

The Theory That the FBI Is Out to Get Clinton Is Becoming More Plausible – By Ben Mathis-Lilley NOV. 3 2016 4:10 PM


161103_slatest_fbi-jpg-crop-promovar-mediumlarge
FBI HQ.
Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

When Democrats reacted to FBI director James Comey’s letter to Congress about the sort-of-reopened investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private server by accusing Comey of trying to meddle in the election on behalf of the Republican Party, the accusation seemed far-fetched. Comey was, until last Friday, generally despised by Republicans for his earlier decision to recommend against prosecuting Clinton. But while there’s been of yet no evidence revealed that Comey himself has an axe to grind, a number of data points have emerged indicating the presence of a politically motivated anti-Clinton faction within the agency.

For one, leaks keep coming out of the FBI that are unflattering to Clinton. First there was the revelation that the Clinton emails the FBI is currently checking for classified info came from Anthony Weiner’s computer. (A good rule of thumb is that no political candidate wants his/her name anywhere near a headline that also involves the notorious A-Weens.) Then there was a story on Fox News (and a much more measured one in the Wall Street Journal) about the existence of an investigation into potential corruption at the Clinton Foundation. And the FBI also tweeted about a document release related to Bill Clinton’s controversial pardon of Marc Rich.

On a parallel track, there was a report today in the Guardian about FBI agents actively supporting Trump:

“The FBI is Trumpland,” said one current agent … The currently serving FBI agent said Clinton is “the antichrist personified to a large swath of FBI personnel,” and that “the reason why they’re leaking is they’re pro-Trump.”

Article continues:

US election 2016: Hillary Clinton’s bid for Republican stronghold – Anthony Zurcher 23 October 2016


screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-oct-23-2016-10-36

If Hillary Clinton is going to break through the narrow electoral map that has dominated the US presidential landscape for 16 years, some traditionally conservative states are going to have tilt her way.

If she is going to not just edge past Donald Trump but win in a rout, states like Arizona will have to fall into her column.

The home of the Grand Canyon last went Democratic in 1996, when Bill Clinton carried it.

Before that? Harry S Truman in 1948.

The state has a Republican governor and two Republican senators. Going into this election, it had a solid conservative red hue. Now, however, polls indicate Arizona and its 11 electoral votes (out of 270 needed to win the presidency) aren’t just in play, they may be leaning toward Mrs Clinton.

A recent opinion poll has the Democrat up 5% – and others have her with narrow leads or within the margin of error.

Polls aren’t just the only indicator of shifting winds in the desert, however. Voter registration is up big among Democrats, particularly with the state’s growing Hispanic population. In Maricopa County, which contains Phoenix, the state’s largest city, Democratic activist groups claim more than 150,000 new voters added to the rolls.

Former Arizona Governor Jan Brewer has downplayed these numbers, telling the Boston Globe that they constitute “wishful thinking” because Hispanics “don’t get out to vote”.

According to Arizona State University political science Professor Richard Herrera, however, there’s reason to think a surge in voter registration will lead to higher turnout.

“Studies have shown that first-time voters as a result of new registration do tend to vote,” he says. “Arizona is definitely a battleground state in 2016.”

The Clinton campaign certainly believes the numbers are real – and is shifting resources accordingly.

It recently announced it would spend $2m on advertising and get-out-the-vote efforts in the state. Last week, it sent a slew of its top surrogates to help rally party faithful who have long been toward the back of the line when it comes time for national help.

Article continues:

Sen. McCain Says Republicans Will Block All Court Nominations If Clinton Wins – NINA TOTENBERG Facebook Twitter October 17, 20169:44 PM ET


Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz) said Monday that if Hillary Clinton is elected, Republicans will unite to block anyone she nominates to the Supreme Court.

Speaking on WPHT-AM radio’s “Dom Giordano Program” in Philadelphia, McCain pledged to obstruct any Clinton Supreme Court nomination for the current or any future vacancy.

Sen. John McCain speaks to the media, March 16, shortly after President Barack Obama nominated Merrick B. Garland to the Supreme Court. McCain said that the confirmation of the next Justice should occur after the election. Now he vows to block Hillary Clinton’s choice if she wins the election. | Pete Marovich/Getty Images

“I promise you that we will be united against any Supreme Court nominee that Hillary Clinton, if she were president, would put up,” he declared.

McCain said that’s why it is so important that Republicans retain control of the Senate.

Given that two of the sitting justices are 80 or older, and another is 78, there is a strong possibility that the next president will have more than one high court opening to fill.

Article continues:

Michelle Obama becomes Clinton’s most powerful weapon – By Niall Stanage – 10/13/16 05:18 PM EDT


Getty Images

Michelle Obama proved her effectiveness as a surrogate for Hillary Clinton in the most dramatic fashion yet on Thursday.

The first lady eviscerated Donald Trump in a speech in Manchester, N.H., hammering him for his rhetoric and behavior toward women.

“This is not normal. This is not politics as usual,” Obama said at one point. “This is disgraceful. It is intolerable.”

Though she did not name Trump in her address, she did refer to the 2005 tape of the GOP presidential nominee boasting to TV anchor Billy Bush about being able to grab women by the genitals without permission because he was famous.

“This was not just a lewd conversation, that wasn’t just locker room banter,” the first lady said. “This was a powerful individual speaking freely and openly about sexually predatory behavior and actually bragging about kissing and groping women — using language so obscene that many of us were worried about children hearing it when we turn on the TV.”

The speech caught fire on social media and elsewhere even as Obama was still at the lectern, with left-leaning pundits and others heaping praise upon her.

Article continues:

For Hillary Clinton and Vladimir Putin, the Mistrust Is Mutual – WSJ


While Vladimir Putin has called Donald Trump a “colorful and talented person,” the Kremlin has long viewed Hillary Clinton as pushing a democratization agenda that it sees as a threat to its sovereignty.

Source: For Hillary Clinton and Vladimir Putin, the Mistrust Is Mutual – WSJ

Grading the Presidential Candidates on Science – By Christine Gorman, Ryan F. Mandelbaum on September 26, 2016


Scientific American evaluates responses from Clinton, Trump, Johnson and Stein to 20 questions

852c7acf-a72a-4a04-9d20927779907264
Credit: MARK MAKELA Getty Images (Hillary Clinton); ALEX WONG Getty Images (Donald TrumpGary Johnson); WIN McNAMEE Getty Images (Jill Stein)  

Two weeks ago, Scientific American asked for your help in grading the presidential candidates on their answers to 20 questions about various aspects of scientific endeavor. The questions were refined by a group of scientific institutions representing more than 10 million scientists and engineers, with nonprofit organization ScienceDebate.org as the facilitator.

We received nearly two dozen responses from readers, most of whom not only evaluated the candidates’ responses but provided detailed explanations for their ratings. Overall, Democratic Party candidate Hillary Clinton scored highest in our readers’ estimation, as well as our own, followed by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. Republican Party candidate Donald Trump came in last on all counts. One Ph.D. in biology wrote, “Trump’s answers demonstrate an almost complete ignorance of science or the importance of these imposing problems facing us in maintaining a livable world for everyone.” A clinical microbiologist with 25 years of experience added, “[Trump’s] answers show how uninformed he is on the issues.”  Although Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson’s responses arrived too late for reader evaluations, we have included our assessment of his responses below.

One researcher performed a “qualitative analysis” of the answers, saying that Clinton always starts “with a synthetic review of present data” and builds from there—whereas “Trump never does.” A food policy analyst failed Clinton on the food question for being too narrow in her responses, failed Trump for “partisan rhetoric,” and gave Stein a grade “between pass and fail” for being “clearer on issues pertaining to negative externalities of food production,” but failing “to mention issues of food equity and proper resource management.” A few readers found some of the questions too vague (particularly number 1 on innovation and number 13 on the global economy), and thus too easy to answer with generalities.

Article continues: