Fast food workers plan nationwide strike for December 4 – by Ned Resnikoff November 29, 2014 12:01AM ET Updated 2:33PM ET


Screen Shot 2014-11-30 at Nov 30, 2014 1.40

Fast food workers in at least 150 cities nationwide will walk off the job on Dec. 4, demanding an industry-wide base wage of $15 per hour and the right to form a union. Workers unanimously voted on the date for the new strike during a Nov. 25 conference call, held shortly before the second anniversary of the movement’s first strike.

The first of the recent fast food strikes took place on Nov. 29, 2012, in New York City. Two hundred workers from various fast food restaurants around the city participated in that strike, making it the largest work stoppage to ever hit the fast food industry. Since then, the size of the movement has ballooned several times over: With the backing of the powerful service sector labor union SEIU, the campaign has come to include thousands of workers in the U.S.

One of the campaign’s main targets, the McDonald’s Corporation, has long maintained that labor protests against the company are not actually strikes in any meaningful sense.

“These are not ‘strikes,’ but are organized rallies for which demonstrators are transported to various locations, and are often paid for their participation,” said a company spokesperson in an emailed statement. “At McDonald’s we respect everyone’s right to peacefully protest.”

The National Worker Organizing committee, a nationwide steering group of 26 fast food workers around the country, approved the Dec. 4 strike date before it was proposed to the rest of the workers. Workers from all 150 cities involved in the campaign were then invited to vote on the date over a Nov. 25 conference call.

The proposal for a strike date was put forth by Burger King and Pizza Hut employee Terrence Wise, a leader in the Kansas City, Missouri branch of the committee. He exhorted workers across the country to recruit more co-workers and make the Dec. 4 the date of the biggest strike yet.

Article continues:

http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2014/11/29/fast-food-workersplannationwidestrikefordecember4.html

Fast food isn’t making our kids fat. It’s the rest of their diet. – By Melissa Healy January 16, 2014, 4:14 p.m.


Imagine for a moment that all of the nation’s fast-food establishments–all the striped awnings and golden arches, the drive-thru windows, the beckoning dollar deals and wafting odor of French fries–were to vanish overnight. Would the number of our kids who carry an unhealthful amount of extra weight plummet?Screen Shot 2014-01-17 at Jan 17, 2014 1.12

The answer is very likely no, says a study published Thursday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Because if you shut off the supply of 24-ounce fountain drinks, bacon cheeseburgers, fried chicken and stuffed tacos, the children who frequently eat at fast-food restaurants will go home and do what they generally do when not eating at a fast-food restaurant: They’ll snarf cookies and chips, chug sugar-sweetened soda from a bottle, and heat up frozen pizzas.

In a new study, researchers from the University of North Carolina led by nutrition professor Barry Popkin have found that even when they are not eating at fast-food restaurants, children who frequent them tend to eat food that would probably make many of them overweight or obese anyway. The authors of the latest research combed through a national database of Americans’ health and nutrition behaviors and grouped 4,466 American kids–from ages 2 to 18–according to what they ate when they were not eating food purchased at a fast-food restaurant.

RELATED: Foods that affect your risk of cancer

Participants were designated “Western diet” consumers if their consumption from non-fast-food sources was relatively high in saturated fats and added sugars. Those classified as following a “prudent diet” ate more fruits and vegetables, leaner proteins and less added sugar and saturated fat.

After doing so, they went back to the children’s detailed food consumption records and categorized them as nonconsumers of fast food (those whose food tracking records indicated no calories consumed from a restaurant or eating establishment without servers), low consumers (whose food tracking records indicated that no more than 30% of their calories came from such an establishment), and high consumers (for whom more than 30% of calories consumed came from a fast-food restaurant).

The result: Those who followed the Western dietary pattern when not dining at fast-food restaurants–even those who were considered “nonconsumers” of fast food–had the highest rates of being overweight or obese. Those who followed a “prudent diet” when not dining on fast food–even those who were considered high consumers of fast food–were significantly less likely to be overweight or obese.

On average, low consumers of fast food were 1.5 times as likely to follow a Western diet pattern of consumption than people who were considered nonconsumers of fast food. High consumers of fast food were 2.2 times as likely to do so.

“Our findings suggest that the location where foods are obtained may not be as important as the nutritional quality of the foods consumed,” the authors wrote. They also suggest that “the effect of public health efforts targeted at fast food restaurants may also be overestimated, such that these efforts may be necessary but not sufficient to reduce child obesity if the remainder of the diet is not addressed.”

The study was sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the authors–Jennifer M. Poti, Kiyah J. Duffy and Popkin–declared they had no financial conflicts of interest with respect to the article.

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-fast-food-child-obesity-20140116,0,5246333.story#axzz2qe1X1AOe

These Disturbing Fast Food Truths Will Make You Reconsider Your Lunch – By Renee JacquesPosted: 11/20/2013 1:31 pm EST | Updated: 11/22/2013 1:56 pm EST


McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s, Taco Bell — which one are you craving today? It’s pretty likely that you have a favorite fast food chain and that you love many of the tasty options offered at these restaurants. It’s hard to miss them. As of 2012, there were 263,944 fast food restaurants in America with a combined revenue of well over $100 billion.

With a Gallup poll revealing that 8 in 10 Americans eat fast food at least monthly and half saying they eat it weekly, these companies know they have a good thing going. And with all the savvy marketing they do, it’s no wonder you’re itching for that Big Mac. But before you scarf one down, you might want to truly evaluate what’s going on with your fast food. Here are some truths that may make you wonder if you still want to go to there for lunch.

Look at this delicious egg sandwich from Subway:

subway

Too bad you’re eating a lot more than just eggs:

Subway Breakfast B.M.T.

David DiSalvo, a writer at Forbes, decided to really look into the eggs in popular fast food breakfast sandwiches. What he discovered was that their “eggs” are really a strange concoction that includes eggs and “premium egg blend.” Some things that are in this special blend include glycerin, a solvent found in soap and shaving cream, dimethylpolysiloxane, a silicone that can also be found in Silly Putty, and calcium silicate, a sealant used on roofs and concrete. The age of just cracking an egg and cooking it has long since passed.
Here’s what you get when you order McNuggets:.

mcnuggets

But this is what they may have looked like before:

chicken

“Mechanically-separated meat” is a mixture created when the bones and carcass of a leftover chicken are mixed together in a food processor. There’s been a lot of back and forth about what that lovely pinkish sludge actually looks like, but chef Jamie Oliver decided to create a chicken mixture, shown above, to show what it might theoretically look like. This slime is then molded into a nugget shape, breaded and fried. Reddit user “Dfunkatron,” who claimed to be a former McDonald’s employee, told a horrifying story about his workplace:

Article continues:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/20/fast-food-truths_n_4296243.html

 

Strikes Planned at Fast-Food Outlets By STEVEN GREENHOUSE Published: December 1, 2013


Seeking to increase pressure on McDonald’s, Wendy’s and other fast-food restaurants, organizers of a movement demanding a $15-an-hour wage for fast-food workers say they will sponsor one-day strikes in 100 cities on Thursday and protest activities in 100 additional cities.

Fabrizio Costantini for The New York Times

Protesters outside a Taco Bell in Warren, Mich., in July. Many fast-food restaurant workers say they earn too little to live on.

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As the movement struggles to find pressure points in its quest for substantially higher wages for workers, organizers said strikes were planned for the first time in cities like Charleston, S.C.; Providence, R.I.; and Pittsburgh.

The protests have expanded greatly since November 2012, when 200 fast-food workers engaged in a one-day strike at more than 20 restaurants in New York City, the first such walkout in the history of the nation’s fast-food industry.

“There’s been pretty huge growth in one year,” said Kendall Fells, one of the movement’s main organizers. “People understand that a one-day strike is not going to get them there. They understand that this needs to continue to grow.”

The movement, which includes the groups Fast Food Forward and Fight for 15, is part of a growing union-backed effort by low-paid workers — including many Walmart workers and workers for federal contractors — that seeks to focus attention on what the groups say are inadequate wages.

The fast-food effort is backed by the Service Employees International Union and is also demanding that restaurants allow workers to unionize without the threat of retaliation.

Officials with the National Restaurant Association have said the one-day strikes are publicity stunts. They warn that increasing pay to $15 an hour when the federal minimum wage is $7.25 would cause restaurants to rely more on automation and hire fewer workers.

Industry officials say that only a small percentage of fast-food jobs pay the minimum wage and that those are largely entry-level jobs for workers under 25.

Backers of the movement for higher pay point to studies saying that the average age of fast-food workers is 29 and that more than one-fourth are parents raising children.

Read the rest:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/02/business/economy/wage-strikes-planned-at-fast-food-outlets-in-100-cities.html?src=ISMR_AP_LO_MST_FB