In a Super Bowl Box Pool? Here Are Your Chances –


Likeliest outcomes lie in squares with scores ending in 0, 3, 4 or 7. Least likely: the dreaded 2-2.

Quarterback Cam Newton, left, and Peyton Manning will lead the Carolina Panthers and Denver Broncos, respectively, on Super Bowl Sunday. They aren’t likely to engineer a score in any quarter that ends in 2’s. ENLARGE

Quarterback Cam Newton, left, and Peyton Manning will lead the Carolina Panthers and Denver Broncos, respectively, on Super Bowl Sunday. They aren’t likely to engineer a score in any quarter that ends in 2’s. Photo: Jeremy Brevard/Reuters/Ezra Shaw

By

Jim Chairusmi

Feb. 5, 2016 11:55 a.m. ET

If you’re like millions of Americans, not only will you be watching Super Bowl 50 this Sunday, but you’ll also have at least a modest financial stake in the outcome in the form of the seemingly ubiquitous box pool.

The box pool—known by other names such as a Super Bowl square or grid game—is a simple and typically low-stakes way for even the least ardent sports fan to have reason to care about the game beyond the commercials. In such pools, participants pay a few bucks to place their names on a 10-by-10 grid that is then randomly assigned numbers 0 through 9 horizontally and vertically where each square corresponds to the last digit in each team’s score.

Winners are typically selected by quarter, with the game’s final tally earning the grand prize. For example, if this Sunday’s game between Peyton Manning’s Denver Broncos and Cam Newton’s Carolina Panthers ends Broncos 17, Panthers 10, the square that intersects 7 on Denver’s side and 0 on Carolina’s side wins.

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How Peyton Manning Beat Tom Brady Without Having to Do Much of Anything – By Sharan Shetty JAN. 24 2016 8:43 PM


Peyton Manning and Tom Brady share a moment after Denver's 20-18 victory in the AFC Championship game. Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

Peyton Manning and Tom Brady share a moment after Denver’s 20-18 victory in the AFC Championship game.
Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

In a tense, suffocating contest on Sunday, the Denver Broncos defeated the New England Patriots 20-18 to win the AFC Championship and claim a ticket to Super Bowl 50. Before kickoff, the game was billed as the latest legacy tussle between Tom Brady and Peyton Manning, two very old, very successful quarterbacks who have met in the conference championship four times and led their teams to appearances in six of the past 10 Super Bowls. But in their 17th meeting, the duo had little time to add new sets of heroics to their rivalry; most of their energies were invested, instead, in trying to keep upright.

That’s especially true of Brady, whose toddler-like helplessness in the face of Denver’s defense was the story of the game. Granted, that defense is the best in the league, but the surprise was just how swarming, ominous, and omnipresent the Broncos’ pass rush was, with players like Von Miller and DeMarcus Ware forcing Brady into all sorts of awkward dances, lunges, and tumbles in the backfield. There are quite a few fancy stats that quantify just how much pressure Brady was under, but this about sums it up:

Screen Shot 2016-01-25 at Jan 25, 2016 1.27
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Will Smith’s ‘Concussion’ Puts the NFL Under a Microscope – by Benjamin Snyder DECEMBER 24, 2015, 1:55 PM EST


The league says it welcomes ‘any conversation’ about player health and safety.

The league says it welcomes ‘any conversation’ about player health and safety.

Will Smith could make waves on Christmas Day with the release of a new film he’s starring in that’s on the offensive against the National Football League’s past relationship to player safety.

The film, Concussion, is based on a true story and follows Smith as Dr. Bennet Omalu, the Nigerian forensic pathologist responsible for uncovering the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Dr. Omalu first found CTE during an autopsy of Pittsburgh Steelers Hall of Fame center Mike Webster, who exhibited signs of dementia before dying of a heart attack in 2002. Nearly 90 other deceased former NFL players have been diagnosed with CTE in an ongoing study being conducted at Boston University, 60 Minutes reported last month.

The Sony Pictures’ SNE 0.32% film centers on Dr. Omalu’s attempts at bringing to light his research while the NFL reportedly does its best to keep the findings under wraps. Concussion is being released at an important time for the discussion of head injuries and CTE: U.S. Media outlets, such as The New York Timeshave brought widespread attention to the issue—and the film—in the past year.

Earlier this week, ESPN reported the league pulled out of a funding the Boston University study on football-related head trauma, but NFL spokesperson Brian McCarthy told Fortune the story is “inaccurate.”

“The NFL did not pull funding from the BU study. The NIH makes all funding decisions,” he added. “The NFL has no ‘veto power’ as part of its unrestricted $30 million grant to NIH.”

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http://fortune.com/2015/12/25/stores-open-christmas-restaurant/