The next time someone says your vote doesn’t count, show them this Michelle Obama speech – Updated by Emily Crockett Nov 7, 2016, 11:04pm EST


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When Michelle Obama and Hillary Clinton campaigned together for the first time, Obama showered Clinton with praise as a “friend,” a “policy wonk,” and “my girl.” She said she is “inspired” by Clinton because she has “lived a life grounded in service and sacrifice.”

But one of the most compelling moments of Obama’s speech came when she pushed back against Donald Trump’s “rigged election” talk. She fiercely defended the idea that voting matters, and reminded listeners of the sacrifices that have come with securing the right to vote for all Americans.

Obama said that if Clinton doesn’t win, “that will be on us” for not voting — and that this is exactly what the Trump campaign is hoping for.

“That’s the strategy. To make this election so dirty and ugly that we don’t want any part of it,” Obama said. “So when you hear folks talking about a global conspiracy and saying that this election is rigged, understand that they are trying to get you to stay home. They are trying to convince you that your vote doesn’t matter, that the outcome has already been determined and you shouldn’t even bother making your voice heard. They are trying to take away your hope.”

The Congresswoman Who Paved the Way For Hillary Clinton – By JOSH ZEITZ November 02, 2016


Jeannette Rankin’s career—and the controversy surrounding it—tells us a great deal about what’s changed in the past 100 years, and what hasn’t.

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100 years and a day before Hillary Clinton will cast her vote in a bid to become the first female president of the United States, Jeannette Rankin, a 36-year-old rancher’s daughter from Missoula, Montana, who had devoted her early career to women’s suffrage and progressive reform causes, voted in her state’s federal and local elections. That night, when all the ballots were counted, she made history, becoming the first woman ever to be elected to Congress. “I may be the first woman member of Congress,” she declared after her landslide victory. “But I won’t be the last.”

No less than Hillary Clinton, another trailblazer, Rankin was deeply controversial in her time. But her career—and the controversy surrounding it—tells us a great deal about what’s changed in the past 100 years, and what hasn’t.

For one, first-wave feminists like Rankin did not challenge the idea that there should be separate spheres for men and women; instead they embraced the prevailing orthodoxy and used it to their favor. Like many of her colleagues in the women’s movement, Rankin claimed a role in politics by insisting that women, not men, best knew how to safeguard public health, education and safety.

Ironically, though she fought a much lonelier battle and won a more improbable victory, in some ways, it was easier for Rankin than it is for Clinton today. When she was the only woman to hold elective office at the federal level, she was regarded by some as a “freak.” Few men anticipated a tidal wave of women in politics, which made her less threatening than Clinton—and her gender less a part of the conversation.

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Iraq War architect Colin Powell is voting for Hillary Clinton — along with major right-wing hawks – BEN NORTON


George W. Bush’s secretary of state joins Bush Sr. and a long list of war hawks in supporting Hillary Clinton

Iraq War architect Colin Powell is voting for Hillary Clinton — along with major right-wing hawks

Colin Powell, former secretary of state under President George W. Bush, announced on Tuesday that he will vote for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election.

Powell made the announcement speaking before the Long Island Association, a business organization. “I am voting for Hillary Clinton,” he said, according to a spokesperson for the association. Powell “went on to praise Mrs. Clinton for her skills as a leader and her experience,” The New York Times reported.

Powell also condemned Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, whose campaign has been widely condemned for its racist and xenophobic tactics.

A Long Island Association member who was present at the event told the Times that Powell “spoke about [Trump’s] inexperience, he spoke about the messages that he’s sending out every day to his supporters, which really paints our country in a negative light across the globe with all our allies.”

The former senior Bush administration official joins a long list of right-wing leaderswho are support Hillary Clinton.

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LeBron James endorses Hillary Clinton in emotionally charged declaration | Sport | The Guardian


The basketball superstar says the Democrat will help improve the lot of poorer children ‘no matter what zip code they live in’

Source: LeBron James endorses Hillary Clinton in emotionally charged declaration | Sport | The Guardian