Fed Appears to Hold Line on Rate Plan By JON HILSENRATH And BEN LEUBSDORF Aug. 30, 2015 2:25 p.m. ET


Stock-market volatility and China’s woes fail to alter policy makers’ view of improving job market, economy

Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer, attending the Jackson Hole, Wyo., symposium, avoided sending a signal about whether the Fed will act to raise rates at its next meeting. PHOTO: JONATHAN CROSBY/REUTERS

Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer, attending the Jackson Hole, Wyo., symposium, avoided sending a signal about whether the Fed will act to raise rates at its next meeting. PHOTO: JONATHAN CROSBY/REUTERS

JACKSON HOLE, Wyo.—Federal Reserve officials emerged from a week of head-spinning financial turbulence largely sticking to their plan to raise U.S. interest rates before the end of the year.

During the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City’s annual economic symposium here, many policy makers signaled that stock-market volatility and China’s woes haven’t seriously dented their view that the U.S. job market is improving, and that domestic economic output is expanding at a steady, modest pace.

Inflation might remain low for longer thanks to falling oil prices and a strong dollar. Officials will continue to keep a close watch on markets and China. But they hope U.S. consumer-price inflation will start inching toward their 2% annual target as the economy’s untapped capacity gets used up, leaving them in position to start raising rates after several months of forewarning.

“There is good reason to believe that inflation will move higher as the forces holding inflation down—oil prices and import prices, particularly—dissipate further,” said Fed Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer in comments delivered to the conference, which ended Saturday.

The Fed has said it will raise rates when it is reasonably confident the inflation rate will rise again to 2%. Mr. Fischer’s comments suggested he believed the economy is closer to that point, although he pointedly avoided sending a signal about whether the Fed will act at its next meeting.

“I will not, and indeed cannot, tell you what decision the Fed will reach by Sept. 17,” Mr. Fischer said.

Article continues:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/fed-appears-to-hold-line-on-rate-plan-1440959106