POTUS Voters Say President Can Learn From Failure of Health-Care Bill -By  Janet Hook March 26, 2017 3:22 p.m. ET


Many supporters blame Speaker Paul Ryan and congress for failure to overturn ACA

Students on a school tour of the Capitol try to catch a glimpse of members of Congress walking through Statuary Hall during a House vote on March 24.

Students on a school tour of the Capitol try to catch a glimpse of members of Congress walking through Statuary Hall during a House vote on March 24. Photo: Bill Clark/Zuma Press

The implosion of the House health care bill on Friday was a reminder to Donald Trump supporters of the risks of electing a president as inexperienced as he is in the ways of Washington, said voters interviewed over the weekend.

The fallout for Mr. Trump may be limited for now because the failed bill was widely seen as flawed, and many Trump supporters blame Congress and House Speaker Paul Ryan more than the president for failing to deliver on a central campaign promise.

Still, the decision to pull the bill from the House floor in the face of imminent defeat is shaking confidence in some voters about Mr. Trump’s ability to enact his ambitious agenda.

“I think our president is seeing how difficult it is to make changes to our laws,” said Sheila O’Leary, an independent Trump voter from DeKalb, Illinois. “I’m hopeful that he will learn from this experience and begin to tone down his rhetoric and stay off Twitter. You can’t just create legislation and try to ram it through Congress like they did with ACA. It at least needs to be read and crafted to appeal to the majority.”

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James Comey Could Shed Light on Russia, POTUS’ Wiretap Charge – By  Janet Hook and  Shane Harris Updated March 19, 2017 5:32 p.m. ET


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FBI Director James Comey leaving a closed-door meeting with senators at the U.S. Capitol last week.

FBI Director James Comey leaving a closed-door meeting with senators at the U.S. Capitol last week. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

WASHINGTON—FBI Director James Comey will be called before lawmakers Monday as part of an investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and President Donald Trump’s unsubstantiated accusation that he had been wiretapped by his predecessor during the campaign.

In advance of Mr. Comey’s testimony before the House Intelligence Committee, a number of lawmakers of both parties have said they have seen no evidence to support Mr. Trump’s allegation about then-president Barack Obama . Mr. Trump in early March tweeted that Mr. Obama had tapped the phones at Trump Tower, the New York building where Mr. Trump lived and worked during the campaign, an extraordinary claim of illegal activity by a president.

“Was there a physical wiretap of Trump Tower? No. It never happened,” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R., Calif.) said Sunday on Fox.

National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers is also scheduled to testify before the panel Monday, marking the first time both he and Mr. Comey have publicly testified before Congress since Mr. Trump was inaugurated.

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