Every single county in America is facing the same crisis – KRISTEN CAPPS, THE ATLANTIC CITIES JUN. 20, 2015, 5:25 PM


Map

Atlantic Cities

From Portland, Oregon, to Portland, Maine. From Jacksonville to Juneau. No matter where you look, there isn’t enough affordable housing.

Without exception, there is no county in the U.S. that has enough affordable housing. The crisis is national and it is growing. Since 2000, rents across the nation have increased. So has the number of of families who desperately need affordable housing.

New research from the Urban Institute shows that the supply of housing for extremely low-income families, which was already in short supply, is only declining. In 2013, just 28 of every 100 extremely low-income families could afford their rental homes. Than figure is down from 37 of 100 in 2000—a 25 percent decline over a little more than a decade.

Using data from the Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, researchers built an interactive map to illustrate the nationwide reach of the problem. In no county in the U.S. does the supply of affordable housing meet the demand among extremely low-income households. (Families who made no more than 30 percent of an area’s median household income were considered “extremely low income.”)

Map 2Atlantic Cities

In Travis County, Texas, for example, the extremely low-income cutoff for a family of four is $21,950. There are about 7,000 safe, affordable rental units to meet the needs of these poor Austin families. But there are more than 48,000 extremely low-income families living there.

The Urban Institute’s research shows how the number of extremely low-income households around the nation has grown since 2000. At the same time, federal housing-assistance programs have grown, but not nearly enough to keep up with need. The difference in the availability of affordable housing between 2000 and 2013 is immediately apparent from the maps, especially in states in the South (namely Alabama, Kentucky, and South Carolina), the Midwest (Ohio and Illinois), and the West (Nevada).

Map 3

Atlantic Cities

Strike federal support from the map—as many members of Congress might like to do—and the picture grows considerably bleaker. Extremely low-income households increasingly rely on assistance from HUD: More than 80 percent of affordable rental homes for extremely low-income families are provided through assistance from HUD. (This figure is surging: It was 57 percent of households in 2000.)

The Urban Institute’s interactive map shows just what a dire situation the nation would face without federal housing assistance. In Pulaski County, Arkansas, for example, some 15,000 families met the criteria for extremely low income in 2013 (earning no more than $18,650 for a family of four). Without federal assistance, none of these poor families in Little Rock would have access to affordable housing: zero. As it stands, only 24 extremely low-income families out of every 100 can find safe, affordable rental housing in Little Rock.

Article continues:

http://www.businessinsider.com/every-single-county-in-america-is-facing-the-same-crisis-2015-6

Chart: You’re Working More But Earning Less – By Dave Gilson| Fri Sep. 26, 2014 6:00 AM EDT


We’ll be posting a new chart on the current state of income inequality every day for the next couple of weeks. Yesterday’s chart looked at the history of the 1 percent, from ancient Rome to today.

Today, another look at how middle-class incomes have been stuck in neutral while the rest of the economy has grown. In 2012, the median household income (adjusted for inflation) was the same as it was in 1996.

Sources: Household income: US Census; economic growth: St. Louis Fed; 1 percent: Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty (Excel); corporate profits: St. Louis Fed  

Illustrations and infographic design by Mattias Mackler​

http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2014/09/income-inequality-working-more

Here’s The Most Affluent Town In Every State – ANDY KIERSZ SEP. 9, 2014, 11:08 AM


The geographic distribution of income and wealth in the U.S. is always a fascinating topic.

One of the many types of geography the Census Bureau tabulates figures for are “places.” These are either legally incorporated cities or towns or Census-designated statistical equivalents. In this map, we consider places with at least 1,000 residents, according to the 2008-2012 American Community Survey.

Using income estimates from the ACS, we found the place with the highest median household income in each state. The map shows where the affluent towns are, and the median income in each:

Many of the affluent communities are wealthy suburbs of major cities such as Scarsdale, New York, and Darien, Connecticut, outside of New York City, and Chevy Chase, Maryland, and Great Falls, Virginia, near Washington, D.C. They all tend to be fairly small with populations ranging from about 1,000 (our chosen lower cutoff) to about 18,000.

Here’s a table with the 50 towns and their median incomes:

Most affluent places table
Business Insider/Andy Kiersz, data from 2008-2012 American Community Survey

NOW WATCH: Here’s The US City With The Most Desirable People

http://www.businessinsider.com/affluent-towns-map-2014-9?utm_source=slate&utm_medium=referral&utm_term=partner

Overworked America: 12 Charts That Will Make Your Blood Boil – By Dave Gilson | July/August 2011 Issue


Why “efficiency” and “productivity” really mean more profits for corporations and less sanity for you.

 

Illustration: Mark Matcho; Chart Artwork: Jeff Berlin

Want more rage? We’ve got 11 charts that show how the superrich spoil it for the rest of us.

In the past 20 years, the US economy has grown nearly 60 percent. This huge increase in productivity is partly due to automation, the internet, and other improvements in efficiency. But it’s also the result of Americans working harder—often without a big boost to their bottom lines. Oh, and meanwhile, corporate profits are up 20 percent. (Also read our essay on the great speedup and harrowing first-person tales of overwork.)

You have nothing to lose but your gains

Productivity has surged, but income and wages have stagnated for most Americans. If the median household income had kept pace with the economy since 1970, it would now be nearly $92,000, not $50,000.

Growth is back…

…But jobs aren’t

Sorry, not hiring

The sectors that have contributed the most to the country’s overall economic growth have lagged when it comes to creating jobs.

 

See the rest of the charts here:

Overworked America: 12 Charts That Will Make Your Blood Boil – By Dave Gilson | July/August 2011 Issue


Illustration: Mark Matcho; Chart Artwork: Jeff Berlin

Want more rage? We’ve got 11 charts that show how the superrich spoil it for the rest of us.

In the past 20 years, the US economy has grown nearly 60 percent. This huge increase in productivity is partly due to automation, the internet, and other improvements in efficiency. But it’s also the result of Americans working harder—often without a big boost to their bottom lines. Oh, and meanwhile, corporate profits are up 20 percent. (Also read our essay on the great speedup and harrowing first-person tales of overwork.)

You have nothing to lose but your gains

Productivity has surged, but income and wages have stagnated for most Americans. If the median household income had kept pace with the economy since 1970, it would now be nearly $92,000, not $50,000.

Growth is back…

…But jobs aren’t

Sorry, not hiring

The sectors that have contributed the most to the country’s overall economic growth have lagged when it comes to creating jobs.

The wage freeze

Increase in real value of the minimum wage since 1990: 21%

Increase in cost of living since 1990: 67%

One year’s earnings at the minimum wage:$15,080

Income required for a single worker to have real economic security: $30,000

Working 9 to 7

For Americans as a whole, the length of a typical workweek hasn’t changed much in years. But for many middle-class workers, job obligations are creeping into free time and family time. For low-income workers, hours have declined due to a shrinking job market, causing underemployment.

Labor pains

Median yearly earnings of:

Union workers: $47,684

Non-union workers: $37,284

Dude, Where’s My Job?

More and more, US multinationals are laying off workers at home and hiring overseas.

Proud to be an American

The US is part of a very small club of nations that don’t require…

Article continues:

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/06/speedup-americans-working-harder-charts

Washington- A World Apart. The Washington Post analyzed census data to find Zip codes where people rank highest on a combination of income and education. They are Super Zips.


to use the interactive version of this map click this photo or the link below

to use the interactive version of this map click this photo or the link below

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/local/2013/11/09/washington-a-world-apart/

Finding Super Zips: The Washington Post analyzed census data to find Zip codes where people rank highest on a combination of income and education. They are Super Zips.

The ranks, ranging from 0 to 99, represent the average of each Zip’s percentile rankings for median household income and for the share of adults with college degrees. Super Zips rank 95 or higher. This approach is adapted from one used by author Charles Murray.

The map at top shows the nation’s 650 Super Zips. Among them, the typical household income is $120,272, and 68 percent of adults hold college degrees. That compares with $53,962 and 27 percent for the remaining 23,925 Zips shown. Only Zips with at least 500 adults are displayed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/local/2013/11/09/washington-a-world-apart/