Is hosting the Super Bowl worth the NFL’s ransom? | Les Carpenter | Sport | The Guardian


The Super Bowl draws in the crowds but host cities often have to bend to the wishes of the NFL. Photograph: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

The Super Bowl draws in the crowds but host cities often have to bend to the wishes of the NFL. Photograph: Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Politicians love to brag about the financial perks of hosting a Super Bowl – but cities like Houston are buying themselves civic pride, not a boost to the economy

Source: Is hosting the Super Bowl worth the NFL’s ransom? | Les Carpenter | Sport | The Guardian

If You Go Near the Super Bowl, You Will Be Surveilled Hard – APRIL GLASER. 01.31.16. 7:00 AM


Super Bowl 50 will be big in every way. A hundred million people will watch the game on TV. Over the next ten days, 1 million people are expected to descend on the San Francisco Bay Area for the festivities. And, according to the FBI, 60 federal, state, and local agencies are working together to coordinate surveillance and security at what is the biggest national security event of the year.

The Department of Homeland Security, the agency coordinating the Herculean effort, classifies every Super Bowl as a special event assignment rating (SEAR) 1 event, with the exception of the 2002 Super Bowl, which got the highest ranking because it followed the September 11 terror attacks—an assignment usually reserved for only the Presidential Inauguration. A who’s-who of agencies, ranging from the DEA and TSA to the US Secret Service to state and local law enforcement and even the Coast Guard has spent more than two years planning for the event.

All of which means that if you’re attending the game, or just happen to be in the general vicinity of the myriad events leading up to the Super Bowl, you will be watched. Closely. The festivities started Saturday and run through February 7, when the Carolina Panthers meet the Denver Broncos at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara. Here’s a sampling of the technology Big Brother can use to surveil you during the Super Bowl in the Bay Area.

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SORRY, NFL GAMES STREAMED FREE TO TV WON’T BECOME THE NORM – BRIAN BARRETT. 09.02.15. 5:02 PM


Next year, CBS will broadcast the Super Bowl for the first time since 2013. When it does, it will send the game not just to its traditional television viewers or its mobile app, but to Apple TV, Roku, Chromecast, and Xbox One, all for free, with no authentication required. For a very specific subset of sports-loving cord-cutters, Christmas has come early.

The most common complaint about cutting the cord is that you can’t reliably watch sports, or other marquee live events like the Oscars. Workarounds like antennas or streaming television packages like Sling TV can be either clunky or unreliable. And previous adventures in bringing big events online for the masses have been hamstrung by a variety of limitations. ABC required cable subscription authentication to watch the Oscars, despite originating on a broadcast network—that is, as an event ostensibly viewable for free. NBC made last year’s Super Bowl available without authentication, but only on mobile apps and on the web. The network also streamed its Sunday night games on mobile apps, but required authentication for those. CBS has streamed AFC playoff games in the past with no authentication required, but only on mobile apps. It gets confusing.

You’ll simply need to open the CBS Sports app on the set-top box of your choice and hope you bought enough dip.

This year’s Super Bowl—along with a Thanksgiving NFL game, and another played in London—will suffer no such streaming restrictions. You won’t need to prove you have cable or buy an ungainly antenna to view it. You’ll simply need to open the CBS Sports app on the set-top box of your choice and hope you bought enough dip.

“There’s not a one-size-fits-all approach with our streaming rights/offerings, and we always want to make sure we offer the best user experience for each event,” says CBS Interactive spokesperson Annie Rohrs.

That’s a huge relief those who have abandoned live TV altogether in their quest for streaming liberation, and who weren’t planning to watch the Super Bowl at a friend’s house or bar. That’s likely a minuscule fraction, though, of the more than 100 million people who tune into the biggest game in sports every year. Which means, says streaming media analyst Dan Rayburn, that we shouldn’t read too much into it.

“I don’t think it’s a big deal at all, frankly,” says Rayburn, who argues that most people already have access to CBS either through cable or an antenna set-up. “It’s nice that it’s available on things other than apps, but if you’re in front a of a big TV to begin with, why wouldn’t you watch it on broadcast?”

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http://www.wired.com/2015/09/super-bowl-stream-apple-tv-roku-free/

The Crazy Final Minutes of the Super Bowl, in Five Vines – By Ben Mathis-Lilley FEB. 1 2015 10:21 PM


Patriots Win Super Bowl After Shocking Last-Second Goal-Line Interception

Malcolm Butler intercepted a Russell Wilson pass on the goal line with 20 seconds left as the New England Patriots beat the Seattle Seahawks 28-24 in a thrilling, confounding Super Bowl XLIX.

Tom Brady threw a touchdown to Julian Edelman with just over two minutes left to give the Patriots the lead.

But with just a minute to go, Jermaine Kearse bobbled and caught a tipped pass to put the Seahawks in scoring position in the most unlikely fashion.